Cannabis use and bone mineral density

NHANES 2007–2010

Donald Bourne, Wesley Plinke, Elizabeth R. Hooker, Carrie Nielson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Summary: Cannabis use is rising in the USA. Its relationship to cannabinoid signaling in bone cells implies its use could affect bone mineral density (BMD) in the population. In a national survey of people ages 20–59, we found no association between self-reported cannabis use and BMD of the hip or spine. Introduction: Cannabis is the most widely used illegal drug in the USA, and its recreational use has recently been approved in several US states. Cannabinoids play a role in bone homeostasis. We aimed to determine the association between cannabis use and BMD in US adults. Methods: In the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2007–2010, 4743 participants between 20 and 59 years old, history of cannabis use was categorized into never, former (previous use, but not in last 30 days), light (1–4 days of use in last 30 days), and heavy (≥5 days of use in last 30 days). Multivariable linear regression was used to test the association between cannabis use and DXA BMD of the proximal femur and lumbar spine with adjustment for age, sex, BMI, and race/ethnicity among other BMD determinants. Results: Sixty percent of the population reported ever using cannabis; 47% were former users, 5% were light users, and 7% were heavy users. Heavy cannabis users were more likely to be male, have a lower BMI, increased daily alcohol intake, increased tobacco pack-years, and were more likely to have used other illegal drugs (cocaine, heroin, or methamphetamines). No association between cannabis and BMD was observed for any level of use (p ≥ 0.28). Conclusions: A history of cannabis use, although highly prevalent and related to other risk factors for low BMD, was not independently associated with BMD in this cross-sectional study of American men and women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number29
JournalArchives of Osteoporosis
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2017

Fingerprint

Nutrition Surveys
Cannabis
Bone Density
Cannabinoids
Spine
Light
Bone and Bones
Methamphetamine
Heroin
Cocaine
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Femur
Population
Tobacco
Hip
Linear Models
Homeostasis
Cross-Sectional Studies
Alcohols

Keywords

  • Bone mineral density
  • Cannabis
  • Drug use
  • NHANES
  • Osteoporosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Cannabis use and bone mineral density : NHANES 2007–2010. / Bourne, Donald; Plinke, Wesley; Hooker, Elizabeth R.; Nielson, Carrie.

In: Archives of Osteoporosis, Vol. 12, No. 1, 29, 01.12.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bourne, Donald ; Plinke, Wesley ; Hooker, Elizabeth R. ; Nielson, Carrie. / Cannabis use and bone mineral density : NHANES 2007–2010. In: Archives of Osteoporosis. 2017 ; Vol. 12, No. 1.
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