Candida glabrata is an emerging cause of oropharyngeal candidiasis in patients receiving radiation for head and neck cancer

Spencer W. Redding, Marta C. Dahiya, William R. Kirkpatrick, Brent J. Coco, Thomas F. Patterson, Annette W. Fothergill, Michael G. Rinaldi, Charles Thomas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

60 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC) is relatively common in patients receiving radiation for head and neck cancer occurring in approximately 25% of patients. Candida albicans has been described as the primary infecting organism. Recently, other organisms, particularly Candida glabrata, have emerged as causative agents of OPC among immunocompromised patients. This study describes the characteristics of 6 patients with head and neck cancer treated with radiotherapy at our institution, who were found to have Candida glabrata-associated OPC and their responses to oral fluconazole. All 6 patients were successfully treated with oral fluconazole. However, most did not respond to the usual dose of 100 mg/day necessitating doses ranging from 200 to 800 mg/day to achieve clinical cure. All 3 patients receiving radiation only were successfully treated with up to 200 mg/day; 2 of 3 patients receiving concomitant chemoradiation required doses ranging from 400 to 800 mg/day. As with systemic infection, previous fluconazole use appears to be a risk factor for this infection, but not with all patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)47-52
Number of pages6
JournalOral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology, Oral Radiology, and Endodontics
Volume97
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2004
Externally publishedYes

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Candida glabrata
Candidiasis
Head and Neck Neoplasms
Radiation
Fluconazole
Immunocompromised Host
Infection
Candida albicans
Radiotherapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dentistry(all)
  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Surgery

Cite this

Candida glabrata is an emerging cause of oropharyngeal candidiasis in patients receiving radiation for head and neck cancer. / Redding, Spencer W.; Dahiya, Marta C.; Kirkpatrick, William R.; Coco, Brent J.; Patterson, Thomas F.; Fothergill, Annette W.; Rinaldi, Michael G.; Thomas, Charles.

In: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology, Oral Radiology, and Endodontics, Vol. 97, No. 1, 01.2004, p. 47-52.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Redding, Spencer W. ; Dahiya, Marta C. ; Kirkpatrick, William R. ; Coco, Brent J. ; Patterson, Thomas F. ; Fothergill, Annette W. ; Rinaldi, Michael G. ; Thomas, Charles. / Candida glabrata is an emerging cause of oropharyngeal candidiasis in patients receiving radiation for head and neck cancer. In: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology, Oral Radiology, and Endodontics. 2004 ; Vol. 97, No. 1. pp. 47-52.
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