Calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II and long-term potentiation enhance synaptic transmission by the same mechanism

Pierre Marie Lledo, Gregory O. Hjelmstad, Sucheta Mukherji, Thomas Soderling, Robert C. Malenka, Roger A. Nicoll

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    328 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Ca2+-sensitive kinases are thought to play a role in long-term potentiation (LTP). To test the involvement of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaM-K II), a truncated, constitutively active form of this kinase was directly injected into CA1 hippocampal pyramidal cells. Inclusion of CaM- K II in the recording pipette resulted in a gradual increase in the size of excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs). No change in evoked responses occurred when the pipette contained heat-inactivated kinase. The effects of CaM-K II mimicked several features of LTP in that it caused a decreased incidence of synoptic failures, an increase in the size of spontaneous EPSCs, and an increase in the amplitude of responses to iontophoretically applied α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate. To determine whether the CaM-K II-induced enhancement and LTP share a common mechanism, occlusion experiments were carried out. The enhancing action of CaM-K II was greatly diminished by prior induction of LTP. In addition, following the increase in synaptic strength by CaM-K II, tetanic stimulation failed to evoke LTP. These findings indicate that CaM-K II alone is sufficient to augment synaptic strength and that this enhancement shares the same underlying mechanism as the enhancement observed with LTP.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)11175-11179
    Number of pages5
    JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
    Volume92
    Issue number24
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Nov 21 1995

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    Calcium-Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinases
    Long-Term Potentiation
    Synaptic Transmission
    Calcium
    Phosphotransferases
    Excitatory Postsynaptic Potentials
    Pyramidal Cells
    Hot Temperature
    Incidence

    Keywords

    • glutamate receptor
    • learning
    • synaptic plasticity

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Genetics
    • General

    Cite this

    Calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II and long-term potentiation enhance synaptic transmission by the same mechanism. / Lledo, Pierre Marie; Hjelmstad, Gregory O.; Mukherji, Sucheta; Soderling, Thomas; Malenka, Robert C.; Nicoll, Roger A.

    In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Vol. 92, No. 24, 21.11.1995, p. 11175-11179.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Lledo, Pierre Marie ; Hjelmstad, Gregory O. ; Mukherji, Sucheta ; Soderling, Thomas ; Malenka, Robert C. ; Nicoll, Roger A. / Calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II and long-term potentiation enhance synaptic transmission by the same mechanism. In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 1995 ; Vol. 92, No. 24. pp. 11175-11179.
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