Burden of Illness in Painful Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

The Patients' Perspectives

Mugdha Gore, Nancy A. Brandenburg, Deborah L. Hoffman, Kei Sing Tai, Brett Stacey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

151 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Our goal was to assess the patient-level burden among subjects with painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). Community-based physicians recruited patients with painful DPN (N = 255) between April and October 2003. Patients completed a survey on pain experience (Brief Pain Inventory-DPN [BPI-DPN]), health status (EuroQoL [EQ-5D]), healthcare utilization (consults, prescription [Rx], and over-the-counter [OTC] medications), and work productivity/functioning. Patients were 61 ± 12.8 years old and had diabetes for 12 ± 10.3 years and painful DPN for 6.4 ± 6.4 years; 25.5 and 62.7% had other neuropathic and musculoskeletal pain conditions. Average and worst pain scores (BPI-DPN, 0-10 scales) were 5.0 ± 2.5 and 5.6 ± 2.8. The mean EQ-5D utility was .5 ± .3 (range = -.594-1). A majority (87.4%) took pain medications (Rx/OTC) in the preceding week: an average of 3.8 ± 3.9 Rx and 2.1 ± 1.3 OTC medications. Nearly half (46.7%) received NSAIDs. Other frequently reported medications were short/long-acting opioids (43.1%), anticonvulsants (27.1%), selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors/selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (18%), and tricyclic antidepressants (11.4%). During the preceding 3 months, 59.6% had ≥2 health professional consults; 59% reported decreased home productivity; 85.5% reported activity limitations; and 64.4% of patients who worked (N = 73) reported missing work/decreased work productivity due to painful DPN. Our results underscore a substantial patient-level burden among subjects with painful DPN. Perspective: Information on the patient-level burden among painful DPN sufferers in the U.S. was previously lacking. Our results suggest that this burden is significant, evidenced by moderate-to-high pain levels, polypharmacy, health resource use, and work/activity limitations. Results also suggest suboptimal pain management and low levels of satisfaction with treatments.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)892-900
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Pain
Volume7
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2006

Fingerprint

Cost of Illness
Diabetic Neuropathies
Peripheral Nervous System Diseases
Pain
Health Status
Polypharmacy
Musculoskeletal Pain
Equipment and Supplies
Tricyclic Antidepressive Agents
Health Resources
Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors
Neuralgia
Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Pain Management
NAD
Anticonvulsants
Opioid Analgesics
Prescriptions
Norepinephrine
Delivery of Health Care

Keywords

  • burden of illness
  • economic burden
  • health surveys
  • human burden
  • pain experience
  • Painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurology
  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Gore, M., Brandenburg, N. A., Hoffman, D. L., Tai, K. S., & Stacey, B. (2006). Burden of Illness in Painful Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy: The Patients' Perspectives. Journal of Pain, 7(12), 892-900. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpain.2006.04.013

Burden of Illness in Painful Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy : The Patients' Perspectives. / Gore, Mugdha; Brandenburg, Nancy A.; Hoffman, Deborah L.; Tai, Kei Sing; Stacey, Brett.

In: Journal of Pain, Vol. 7, No. 12, 12.2006, p. 892-900.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gore, M, Brandenburg, NA, Hoffman, DL, Tai, KS & Stacey, B 2006, 'Burden of Illness in Painful Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy: The Patients' Perspectives', Journal of Pain, vol. 7, no. 12, pp. 892-900. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpain.2006.04.013
Gore, Mugdha ; Brandenburg, Nancy A. ; Hoffman, Deborah L. ; Tai, Kei Sing ; Stacey, Brett. / Burden of Illness in Painful Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy : The Patients' Perspectives. In: Journal of Pain. 2006 ; Vol. 7, No. 12. pp. 892-900.
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