Brief report: In-home family therapy for adolescents with poorly controlled diabetes: Failure to maintain benefits at 6-month follow-up

Michael Harris, Brandonn S. Harris, Deborah Mertlich

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To examine 6-month follow-up data on the effectiveness of in-home Behavioral Family Systems Therapy (BFST) for adolescents with poorly controlled diabetes, using a pilot and feasibility study. Methods: Eighteen adolescents with poorly controlled diabetes received ten 90-min sessions of in-home BFST. Diabetes-related functioning, general family functioning, and health status were assessed at baseline, immediately following treatment and 6-months after the treatment. Results: Although the initial posttreatment follow-up evaluation indicated decreases in general family conflict, diabetes-related family conflict, and behavior problems, evaluation at a 6-month follow-up (N = 17) demonstrated that initial posttreatment improvements were no longer present for any of the variables assessed. Metabolic control remained unchanged from baseline to initial posttreatment as well as at 6-month follow-up. Conclusions: A plausible explanation for this finding is that participating families were experiencing distress that required longer-term treatment for enduring results, beyond what was employed in this study. Further research is necessary before in-home BFST can be considered an effective psychosocial intervention for adolescents with poorly controlled diabetes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)683-688
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Pediatric Psychology
Volume30
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2005
Externally publishedYes

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Family Therapy
Family Conflict
Family Health
Feasibility Studies
Health Status
Therapeutics
Research

Keywords

  • Adolescents
  • Diabetes
  • Family therapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Brief report : In-home family therapy for adolescents with poorly controlled diabetes: Failure to maintain benefits at 6-month follow-up. / Harris, Michael; Harris, Brandonn S.; Mertlich, Deborah.

In: Journal of Pediatric Psychology, Vol. 30, No. 8, 12.2005, p. 683-688.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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