Breathlessness during different forms of ventilatory stimulation

A study of mechanisms in normal subjects and respiratory patients

L. Adams, R. Lane, Steven Shea, A. Cockcroft, A. Guz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

99 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study investigates the mechanisms underlying the perception of breathlessness induced by hypoxia and hypercapnia in both naive normal subjects and patients with respiratory mechanical problems. In normal subjects separately receiving both oscillating hypercapnic and hypoxic ventilatory stimulation, equivalent peak stimulus intensities in end-tidal gas were associated with a 'damped' ventilatory response when the frequency of stimulation was increased. A concomitant fall in peak breathlessness levels on a visual analogue scale was recorded in each case. In normal subjects and patients, the voluntary copying of a ventilatory pattern recorded during oscillating hypercapnic stimulation was associated with a marked diminution or complete absence of breathlessness despite equivalent levels of peak ventilations achieved. Voluntary copying of hypercapnic stimulated ventilation was not associated with any demonstrable change in the distribution of muscle movements between the chest wall and abdomen. These results suggest that the intensity of breathlessness depends on the level of effective reflex stimulation of the respiratory-related neurones in the medulla. They cannot be explained solely in terms of perception of afferent neural information arising from either chemoreceptors or respiratory mechanoreceptors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)663-672
Number of pages10
JournalClinical Science
Volume69
Issue number6
StatePublished - 1985
Externally publishedYes

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Dyspnea
Ventilation
Mechanoreceptors
Hypercapnia
Thoracic Wall
Visual Analog Scale
Abdomen
Reflex
Gases
Neurons
Muscles

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Breathlessness during different forms of ventilatory stimulation : A study of mechanisms in normal subjects and respiratory patients. / Adams, L.; Lane, R.; Shea, Steven; Cockcroft, A.; Guz, A.

In: Clinical Science, Vol. 69, No. 6, 1985, p. 663-672.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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