Breast-feeding Success Among Infants With Phenylketonuria

Sandra Banta-Wight, Kathleen C. Shelton, Nancy D. Lowe, Kathleen A. Knafl, Gail Houck

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Breast milk is the nutrition of choice for human infants (American Academy of Pediatrics, 2005; American Association of Family Physicians, 2008; Association of Women's Health Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses, 2005; Canadian Paediatric Society, 2005; U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, 2008; World Health Organization, 2009). In comparison to standard commercial formula, human breast milk has a lower concentration of protein and a lower content of the amino acid phenylalanine (Phe). For infants with phenylketonuria (PKU), these attributes of human breast milk make it ideal as a base source of nutrition. The purpose of this study was to compare the incidence and duration of breast-feeding and corresponding Phe levels of breast-fed and formula-fed infants with PKU in the caseload of a pediatric metabolic clinic at an urban tertiary-care medical center. Charts were reviewed for infants diagnosed with PKU beginning with 2005 and ending with 1980, the year no further breast-feeding cases were identified in the PKU population. During the first year of life, most of the infants, whether breast-fed or formula-fed, had similar mean Phe levels. However, the frequency distributions revealed that more breast-fed infants with PKU had Phe levels within the normal range (120-360 μmol/L) and were less likely to have low Phe levels (

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)319-327
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Pediatric Nursing
Volume27
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2012

Fingerprint

Phenylketonurias
Human Milk
Breast Feeding
Phenylalanine
Breast
Pediatrics
Infant Formula
Family Physicians
Women's Health
Advisory Committees
Tertiary Care Centers
Obstetrics
Reference Values
Amino Acids
Incidence
Population
Proteins

Keywords

  • Breastfeeding
  • Diet therapy
  • Infant-Newborn
  • Phenylalanine
  • Phenylketonuria

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics

Cite this

Breast-feeding Success Among Infants With Phenylketonuria. / Banta-Wight, Sandra; Shelton, Kathleen C.; Lowe, Nancy D.; Knafl, Kathleen A.; Houck, Gail.

In: Journal of Pediatric Nursing, Vol. 27, No. 4, 08.2012, p. 319-327.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Banta-Wight, Sandra ; Shelton, Kathleen C. ; Lowe, Nancy D. ; Knafl, Kathleen A. ; Houck, Gail. / Breast-feeding Success Among Infants With Phenylketonuria. In: Journal of Pediatric Nursing. 2012 ; Vol. 27, No. 4. pp. 319-327.
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