Breast cancer beliefs and mammography screening practices among Chinese American Immigrants

Frances Lee-Lin, Usha Menon, Marjorie Pett, Lillian Nail, Sharon Lee, Kathi Mooney

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    60 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Objective: To explore knowledge and beliefs (perceived risk factors, susceptibility, benefits, common barriers, and cultural barriers) in relation to mammography screening practices among Chinese American women. Design: A descriptive study guided by the Health Belief Model. Setting: Metropolitan area in the northwestern United States. Participants: One hundred Chinese immigrant women, 40 years or older. Main Outcome Measures: The percentage of Chinese American women ages 40 and older who ever received a mammogram and who received a mammogram within the past year. Results: Although 86% of the respondents reported that they had once had a mammogram, only 48.5% had a mammogram within the past year. The strongest factor associated with having a mammogram within the past year was having an immediate family member diagnosed with breast cancer, followed by having insurance that covered a mammogram and lower perceived barriers to obtaining a mammogram. Respondents had low knowledge of breast cancer and mammography screening guidelines. They also perceived low susceptibility to breast cancer. Conclusions: Nurses may influence the mammogram rates among Chinese American women by providing health education to family members of patients with breast cancer, reducing perceived barriers to mammogram, and seeking alternative payment mechanisms for patients who do not have insurance coverage for mammogram.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)212-221
    Number of pages10
    JournalJOGNN - Journal of Obstetric, Gynecologic, and Neonatal Nursing
    Volume36
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    StatePublished - May 2007

    Fingerprint

    Asian Americans
    Mammography
    Breast Neoplasms
    Northwestern United States
    Insurance Coverage
    Women's Health
    Insurance
    Early Detection of Cancer
    Health Education
    Nurses
    Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
    Guidelines
    Health
    Surveys and Questionnaires

    Keywords

    • Breast cancer beliefs
    • Chinese American immigrant women
    • Health Belief Model
    • Mammography screening

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Obstetrics and Gynecology
    • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

    Cite this

    Breast cancer beliefs and mammography screening practices among Chinese American Immigrants. / Lee-Lin, Frances; Menon, Usha; Pett, Marjorie; Nail, Lillian; Lee, Sharon; Mooney, Kathi.

    In: JOGNN - Journal of Obstetric, Gynecologic, and Neonatal Nursing, Vol. 36, No. 3, 05.2007, p. 212-221.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Lee-Lin, Frances ; Menon, Usha ; Pett, Marjorie ; Nail, Lillian ; Lee, Sharon ; Mooney, Kathi. / Breast cancer beliefs and mammography screening practices among Chinese American Immigrants. In: JOGNN - Journal of Obstetric, Gynecologic, and Neonatal Nursing. 2007 ; Vol. 36, No. 3. pp. 212-221.
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