Breast and cervical cancer screening practices and interventions among Chinese, Japanese, and Vietnamese Americans

Frances Lee-Lin, Usha Menon

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    28 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Purpose/Objectives: To review research on breast and cervical cancer screening practices among Chinese, Japanese, and Vietnamese Americans. Data Sources: MEDLINE® and the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature databases. Data Synthesis: Of the 28 studies reviewed, 19 (68%) were descriptive and 9 (32%) were interventions. Instruments were developed or translated into the native language. Inconsistent operational definitions for positive facilitators and negative barriers made comparisons across studies difficult. Conclusions: Research about breast and cervical cancer screening is limited in these groups. All of the studies reviewed indicated low adherence to cancer screening guidelines. Some interventions showed promising results. Poor awareness about cancer was reported; positive facilitators and negative barriers were identified. Implications for Nursing: The rapidly increasing number of Asian Americans in the United States underscores the need for further research in this area. Future studies should focus on each population as a disaggregated subgroup. Cancer control interventions should be culturally competent.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)995-1003
    Number of pages9
    JournalOncology Nursing Forum
    Volume32
    Issue number5
    DOIs
    StatePublished - 2005

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    Asian Americans
    Early Detection of Cancer
    Uterine Cervical Neoplasms
    Breast Neoplasms
    Nursing
    Research
    Information Storage and Retrieval
    MEDLINE
    Neoplasms
    Language
    Databases
    Guidelines
    Health
    Population

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Oncology(nursing)

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    Breast and cervical cancer screening practices and interventions among Chinese, Japanese, and Vietnamese Americans. / Lee-Lin, Frances; Menon, Usha.

    In: Oncology Nursing Forum, Vol. 32, No. 5, 2005, p. 995-1003.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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