Beyond fibromyalgia

ideas on etiology and treatment.

Robert (Rob) Bennett

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    72 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    A common syndrome of musculoskeletal pain, currently called fibrositis or fibromyalgia, accounts for 10-30% of all rheumatology consultations in North America. Lacking a distinctive pathophysiological basis the nature of the pain experienced by these patients remains elusive and treatment is not based on sound scientific principles. An hypothesis is advanced which suggests that skeletal muscle is the "end organ" responsible for the pain of fibromyalgia and that previous studies on muscle deconditioning and microtrauma may be relevant to the etiopathogenesis of fibromyalgia syndrome.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)185-191
    Number of pages7
    JournalThe Journal of rheumatology. Supplement
    Volume19
    StatePublished - Nov 1989

    Fingerprint

    Fibromyalgia
    Pain
    Musculoskeletal Pain
    Rheumatology
    Therapeutics
    North America
    Skeletal Muscle
    Referral and Consultation
    Muscles

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Immunology
    • Rheumatology

    Cite this

    Beyond fibromyalgia : ideas on etiology and treatment. / Bennett, Robert (Rob).

    In: The Journal of rheumatology. Supplement, Vol. 19, 11.1989, p. 185-191.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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