Better than mermaids and stray dogs? subtyping auditory verbal hallucinations and its implications for research and practice

Simon Mccarthy-Jones, Neil Thomas, Clara Strauss, Guy Dodgson, Nev Jones, Angela Woods, Chris R. Brewin, Mark Hayward, Massoud Stephane, Jack Barton, David Kingdon, Iris E. Sommer

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    44 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The phenomenological diversity of auditory verbal hallucinations (AVH) is not currently accounted for by any model based around a single mechanism. This has led to the proposal that there may be distinct AVH subtypes, which each possess unique (as well as shared) underpinning mechanisms. This could have important implications both for research design and clinical interventions because different subtypes may be responsive to different types of treatment. This article explores how AVH subtypes may be identified at the levels of phenomenology, cognition, neurology, etiology, treatment response, diagnosis, and voice hearer's own interpretations. Five subtypes are proposed; hypervigilance, autobiographical memory (subdivided into dissociative and nondissociative), inner speech (subdivided into obsessional, own thought, and novel), epileptic and deafferentation. We suggest other facets of AVH, including negative content and form (eg, commands), may be best treated as dimensional constructs that vary across subtypes. After considering the limitations and challenges of AVH subtyping, we highlight future research directions, including the need for a subtype assessment tool.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    JournalSchizophrenia Bulletin
    Volume40
    Issue numberSUPPL. 4
    DOIs
    StatePublished - 2014

    Fingerprint

    Hallucinations
    Dogs
    Research
    Episodic Memory
    Neurology
    Cognition
    Research Design
    Anxiety
    Legendary Creatures

    Keywords

    • AVH
    • hearing voices
    • phenomenology
    • schizophrenia
    • symptom classification
    • trauma

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Psychiatry and Mental health

    Cite this

    Mccarthy-Jones, S., Thomas, N., Strauss, C., Dodgson, G., Jones, N., Woods, A., ... Sommer, I. E. (2014). Better than mermaids and stray dogs? subtyping auditory verbal hallucinations and its implications for research and practice. Schizophrenia Bulletin, 40(SUPPL. 4). https://doi.org/10.1093/schbul/sbu018

    Better than mermaids and stray dogs? subtyping auditory verbal hallucinations and its implications for research and practice. / Mccarthy-Jones, Simon; Thomas, Neil; Strauss, Clara; Dodgson, Guy; Jones, Nev; Woods, Angela; Brewin, Chris R.; Hayward, Mark; Stephane, Massoud; Barton, Jack; Kingdon, David; Sommer, Iris E.

    In: Schizophrenia Bulletin, Vol. 40, No. SUPPL. 4, 2014.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Mccarthy-Jones, S, Thomas, N, Strauss, C, Dodgson, G, Jones, N, Woods, A, Brewin, CR, Hayward, M, Stephane, M, Barton, J, Kingdon, D & Sommer, IE 2014, 'Better than mermaids and stray dogs? subtyping auditory verbal hallucinations and its implications for research and practice', Schizophrenia Bulletin, vol. 40, no. SUPPL. 4. https://doi.org/10.1093/schbul/sbu018
    Mccarthy-Jones, Simon ; Thomas, Neil ; Strauss, Clara ; Dodgson, Guy ; Jones, Nev ; Woods, Angela ; Brewin, Chris R. ; Hayward, Mark ; Stephane, Massoud ; Barton, Jack ; Kingdon, David ; Sommer, Iris E. / Better than mermaids and stray dogs? subtyping auditory verbal hallucinations and its implications for research and practice. In: Schizophrenia Bulletin. 2014 ; Vol. 40, No. SUPPL. 4.
    @article{536ab9079673437b992df375b0ca828c,
    title = "Better than mermaids and stray dogs? subtyping auditory verbal hallucinations and its implications for research and practice",
    abstract = "The phenomenological diversity of auditory verbal hallucinations (AVH) is not currently accounted for by any model based around a single mechanism. This has led to the proposal that there may be distinct AVH subtypes, which each possess unique (as well as shared) underpinning mechanisms. This could have important implications both for research design and clinical interventions because different subtypes may be responsive to different types of treatment. This article explores how AVH subtypes may be identified at the levels of phenomenology, cognition, neurology, etiology, treatment response, diagnosis, and voice hearer's own interpretations. Five subtypes are proposed; hypervigilance, autobiographical memory (subdivided into dissociative and nondissociative), inner speech (subdivided into obsessional, own thought, and novel), epileptic and deafferentation. We suggest other facets of AVH, including negative content and form (eg, commands), may be best treated as dimensional constructs that vary across subtypes. After considering the limitations and challenges of AVH subtyping, we highlight future research directions, including the need for a subtype assessment tool.",
    keywords = "AVH, hearing voices, phenomenology, schizophrenia, symptom classification, trauma",
    author = "Simon Mccarthy-Jones and Neil Thomas and Clara Strauss and Guy Dodgson and Nev Jones and Angela Woods and Brewin, {Chris R.} and Mark Hayward and Massoud Stephane and Jack Barton and David Kingdon and Sommer, {Iris E.}",
    year = "2014",
    doi = "10.1093/schbul/sbu018",
    language = "English (US)",
    volume = "40",
    journal = "Schizophrenia Bulletin",
    issn = "0586-7614",
    publisher = "Oxford University Press",
    number = "SUPPL. 4",

    }

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Better than mermaids and stray dogs? subtyping auditory verbal hallucinations and its implications for research and practice

    AU - Mccarthy-Jones, Simon

    AU - Thomas, Neil

    AU - Strauss, Clara

    AU - Dodgson, Guy

    AU - Jones, Nev

    AU - Woods, Angela

    AU - Brewin, Chris R.

    AU - Hayward, Mark

    AU - Stephane, Massoud

    AU - Barton, Jack

    AU - Kingdon, David

    AU - Sommer, Iris E.

    PY - 2014

    Y1 - 2014

    N2 - The phenomenological diversity of auditory verbal hallucinations (AVH) is not currently accounted for by any model based around a single mechanism. This has led to the proposal that there may be distinct AVH subtypes, which each possess unique (as well as shared) underpinning mechanisms. This could have important implications both for research design and clinical interventions because different subtypes may be responsive to different types of treatment. This article explores how AVH subtypes may be identified at the levels of phenomenology, cognition, neurology, etiology, treatment response, diagnosis, and voice hearer's own interpretations. Five subtypes are proposed; hypervigilance, autobiographical memory (subdivided into dissociative and nondissociative), inner speech (subdivided into obsessional, own thought, and novel), epileptic and deafferentation. We suggest other facets of AVH, including negative content and form (eg, commands), may be best treated as dimensional constructs that vary across subtypes. After considering the limitations and challenges of AVH subtyping, we highlight future research directions, including the need for a subtype assessment tool.

    AB - The phenomenological diversity of auditory verbal hallucinations (AVH) is not currently accounted for by any model based around a single mechanism. This has led to the proposal that there may be distinct AVH subtypes, which each possess unique (as well as shared) underpinning mechanisms. This could have important implications both for research design and clinical interventions because different subtypes may be responsive to different types of treatment. This article explores how AVH subtypes may be identified at the levels of phenomenology, cognition, neurology, etiology, treatment response, diagnosis, and voice hearer's own interpretations. Five subtypes are proposed; hypervigilance, autobiographical memory (subdivided into dissociative and nondissociative), inner speech (subdivided into obsessional, own thought, and novel), epileptic and deafferentation. We suggest other facets of AVH, including negative content and form (eg, commands), may be best treated as dimensional constructs that vary across subtypes. After considering the limitations and challenges of AVH subtyping, we highlight future research directions, including the need for a subtype assessment tool.

    KW - AVH

    KW - hearing voices

    KW - phenomenology

    KW - schizophrenia

    KW - symptom classification

    KW - trauma

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84902588459&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84902588459&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    U2 - 10.1093/schbul/sbu018

    DO - 10.1093/schbul/sbu018

    M3 - Article

    AN - SCOPUS:84902588459

    VL - 40

    JO - Schizophrenia Bulletin

    JF - Schizophrenia Bulletin

    SN - 0586-7614

    IS - SUPPL. 4

    ER -