Beliefs about the causes of obesity in a national sample of 4th year medical students

Sean M. Phelan, Diana J. Burgess, Sara E. Burke, Julia M. Przedworski, John F. Dovidio, Rachel Hardeman, Megan Morris, Michelle van Ryn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Physician knowledge of the complex contributors to obesity varies. We do not know whether today's medical students are graduating with deep understanding of the causes of obesity. Our objective was to assess beliefs about causes of obesity in a national sample of 4th year medical students. Method: We randomly selected 2000 4th year students from a random sample of 50 U.S. medical schools and asked them to rate the importance of several factors as causes of obesity. Of those invited, 1244 (62%) responded. We conducted latent class analysis to identify groups with similar response patterns. Results: Most students demonstrated knowledge that obesity has multiple contributors. Students fell into 1 of 4 classes: (1) more likely to endorse all contributors (28%), (2) more likely to endorse physiological contributors (27%), (3) more likely to endorse behavioral or social contributors (24%), and (4) unlikely to endorse contributors outside of overeating and physical activity (22%). Conclusion: Though students were generally aware of multiple causes, there were 4 distinct patterns of beliefs, with implications for patient care. Practice implications: Targeted interventions may help to improve depth of knowledge about the causes of obesity and lead to more effective care for obese patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1446-1449
Number of pages4
JournalPatient Education and Counseling
Volume98
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2015
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Medical Students
Obesity
Students
Patient Care
Hyperphagia
Medical Schools
Exercise
Physicians

Keywords

  • Diet
  • Learning
  • Medical students
  • Obesity
  • Weight bias
  • Weight gain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Phelan, S. M., Burgess, D. J., Burke, S. E., Przedworski, J. M., Dovidio, J. F., Hardeman, R., ... van Ryn, M. (2015). Beliefs about the causes of obesity in a national sample of 4th year medical students. Patient Education and Counseling, 98(11), 1446-1449. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pec.2015.06.017

Beliefs about the causes of obesity in a national sample of 4th year medical students. / Phelan, Sean M.; Burgess, Diana J.; Burke, Sara E.; Przedworski, Julia M.; Dovidio, John F.; Hardeman, Rachel; Morris, Megan; van Ryn, Michelle.

In: Patient Education and Counseling, Vol. 98, No. 11, 01.11.2015, p. 1446-1449.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Phelan, SM, Burgess, DJ, Burke, SE, Przedworski, JM, Dovidio, JF, Hardeman, R, Morris, M & van Ryn, M 2015, 'Beliefs about the causes of obesity in a national sample of 4th year medical students', Patient Education and Counseling, vol. 98, no. 11, pp. 1446-1449. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pec.2015.06.017
Phelan SM, Burgess DJ, Burke SE, Przedworski JM, Dovidio JF, Hardeman R et al. Beliefs about the causes of obesity in a national sample of 4th year medical students. Patient Education and Counseling. 2015 Nov 1;98(11):1446-1449. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pec.2015.06.017
Phelan, Sean M. ; Burgess, Diana J. ; Burke, Sara E. ; Przedworski, Julia M. ; Dovidio, John F. ; Hardeman, Rachel ; Morris, Megan ; van Ryn, Michelle. / Beliefs about the causes of obesity in a national sample of 4th year medical students. In: Patient Education and Counseling. 2015 ; Vol. 98, No. 11. pp. 1446-1449.
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