Behavioral weight loss and physical activity intervention in obese adults with asthma: A randomized trial

Jun Ma, Peg Strub, Lan Xiao, Philip W. Lavori, Carlos A. Camargo, Sandra R. Wilson, Christopher D. Gardner, A (Sonia) Buist, William L. Haskell, Nan Lv

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

50 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Rationale: The effect of weight loss on asthma in obese adults warrants rigorous investigation. Objectives: To examine an evidence-based, practical, and comprehensive lifestyle intervention targeting modest weight loss and increased physical activity for asthma control. Methods: The trial randomized 330 obese adults with uncontrolled asthma to receive usual care enhanced with a pedometer, a weight scale, information about existing weight management services at the participating clinics, and an asthma education DVD, or with these tools plus the 12-month intervention. Measurements and Main Results: The primary outcome was change in Asthma Control Questionnaire (ACQ) scores from baseline to 12 months. Participants (mean [SD] age, 47.6 [12.4] yr) were 70.6% women, 20.0% non-Hispanic black, 20.3% Hispanic/ Latino, and 8.2% Asian/Pacific Islander. At baseline, they were obese (mean [SD] body mass index, 37.5 [5.9] kg/m2) and had uncontrolled asthma (Asthma Control Test score, 15.1 [3.8]). Compared with control subjects, intervention participants achieved significantly greater mean weight loss (±SE) (intervention, -4.0 ± 0.8 kg vs. control, -2.1 ± 0.8 kg; P = 0.01) and increased leisure-time activity (intervention, 418.2 ± 110.6 metabolic equivalent task-min/wk vs. control, 178.8 ± 109.1 metabolic equivalent task-min/wk; P = 0.05) at 12 months. But between-treatment mean (±SE) differences were not significant for ACQ changes (intervention, -0.3 ± 0.1 vs. control, -0.2 ± 0.1; P = 0.92) from baseline (mean [SD], 1.4 [0.8]), nor for any other clinical asthma outcomes (e.g., spirometric results and asthma exacerbations). Among all participants regardless of treatment assignment, weight loss of 10% or greater was associated with a Cohen d effect of 0.76 and with 3.78 (95% confidence interval, 1.72- 8.31) times the odds of achieving clinically significant reductions (i.e., ≥0.5) on ACQ as stable weight (

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-11
Number of pages11
JournalAnnals of the American Thoracic Society
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

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Weight Loss
Asthma
Exercise
Metabolic Equivalent
Hispanic Americans
Weights and Measures
Leisure Activities
Life Style
Body Mass Index
Confidence Intervals
Education
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Adults
  • Asthma
  • Clinical trial
  • Exercise
  • Weight loss

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

Behavioral weight loss and physical activity intervention in obese adults with asthma : A randomized trial. / Ma, Jun; Strub, Peg; Xiao, Lan; Lavori, Philip W.; Camargo, Carlos A.; Wilson, Sandra R.; Gardner, Christopher D.; Buist, A (Sonia); Haskell, William L.; Lv, Nan.

In: Annals of the American Thoracic Society, Vol. 12, No. 1, 01.01.2015, p. 1-11.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ma, J, Strub, P, Xiao, L, Lavori, PW, Camargo, CA, Wilson, SR, Gardner, CD, Buist, AS, Haskell, WL & Lv, N 2015, 'Behavioral weight loss and physical activity intervention in obese adults with asthma: A randomized trial', Annals of the American Thoracic Society, vol. 12, no. 1, pp. 1-11. https://doi.org/10.1513/AnnalsATS.201406-271OC
Ma, Jun ; Strub, Peg ; Xiao, Lan ; Lavori, Philip W. ; Camargo, Carlos A. ; Wilson, Sandra R. ; Gardner, Christopher D. ; Buist, A (Sonia) ; Haskell, William L. ; Lv, Nan. / Behavioral weight loss and physical activity intervention in obese adults with asthma : A randomized trial. In: Annals of the American Thoracic Society. 2015 ; Vol. 12, No. 1. pp. 1-11.
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