Behavior-based safety and working alone: The effects of a self-monitoring package on the safe performance of bus operators

Ryan Olson, John Austin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

45 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Experimental evaluations of Behavior-Based Safety (BBS) processes applied with lone workers are scarce. Clinical and organizational researchers alike have studied the effectiveness of self-monitoring as a performance improvement strategy, but further work is needed to determine the power of such interventions for improving safe behavior and to explore the best practices for using such processes with lone workers. In the current study, four male bus operators (20.5 years average experience) self-monitored their safe performance and received feedback based on self-monitoring data. Dispatch supervisors used radio communication to prompt participants to complete self-monitoring forms and also conducted special observations of participants to measure target performances. Both operators and supervisors were unaware of experimental observers who measured the performance of each participant by riding on busses as passengers. A multiple baseline design across performances was used to assess the effects of the intervention on four performance targets. The intervention resulted in a 12.3% increase in safe performance for the group, with individual increases in performance ranging from 2% to 41% for specific target performances. The results are discussed in terms of the value of BBS processes for employees who work alone and the research needed to determine the components of self-monitoring processes that are most critical for generating improvements in safe performance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)5-43
Number of pages39
JournalJournal of Organizational Behavior Management
Volume21
Issue number3
StatePublished - 2001
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Motor Vehicles
Supervisory personnel
Safety
Monitoring
Radio
Practice Guidelines
Radio communication
Process monitoring
Research Personnel
Research
Personnel
Feedback
Self-monitoring
Bus
Operator

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Management of Technology and Innovation
  • Strategy and Management
  • Applied Psychology

Cite this

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