Awareness, treatment, and control of hypertension and hypercholesterolemia among insured residents of New York City, 2004

Quynh C. Nguyen, Elizabeth Waddell, James C. Thomas, Sara L. Huston, Bonnie D. Kerker, R. Charon Gwynn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: Health care access and sociodemographic characteristics may influence chronic disease management even among adults who have health insurance. The objective of this study was to examine awareness, treatment, and control of hypertension and hypercholesterolemia, by health care access and sociodemographic characteristics, among insured adults in New York City. Methods: Using data from the 2004 New York City Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, we investigated inequalities in the diagnosis and management of hypertension and hypercholesterolemia among insured adults aged 20 to 64 years (n = 1,334). We assessed differences in insurance type (public, private) and routine place of care (yes, no), by sociodemographic characteristics. Results: One in 10 participants with hypertension and 3 in 10 with hypercholesterolemia were unaware and untreated. Having a routine place of care was associated with treatment and control of hypertension and with awareness, treatment, and control of hypercholesterolemia, after adjusting for insurance type, age, sex, race/ethnicity, foreign birth, income, and education. Differences in systolic blood pressure and total cholesterol between people with versus without a routine place of care were 2 to 3 times the difference found between people with public versus private insurance. Few differences were associated with sociodemographic characteristics after adjusting for routine place of care and insurance type; however, male sex, younger age, Asian race, and foreign birth with short-term US residence reduced the odds of having a routine place of care. Neither income nor education predicted having a routine place of care. Conclusion: Sociodemographic characteristics may influence chronic disease management among the insured through health care access factors such as having a routine place of care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberA109
JournalPreventing Chronic Disease
Volume8
Issue number5
StatePublished - Sep 1 2011
Externally publishedYes

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Hypercholesterolemia
Insurance
Hypertension
Disease Management
Delivery of Health Care
Chronic Disease
Parturition
Blood Pressure
Education
Nutrition Surveys
Therapeutics
Health Insurance
Cholesterol
Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health Policy
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Awareness, treatment, and control of hypertension and hypercholesterolemia among insured residents of New York City, 2004. / Nguyen, Quynh C.; Waddell, Elizabeth; Thomas, James C.; Huston, Sara L.; Kerker, Bonnie D.; Gwynn, R. Charon.

In: Preventing Chronic Disease, Vol. 8, No. 5, A109, 01.09.2011.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nguyen, Quynh C. ; Waddell, Elizabeth ; Thomas, James C. ; Huston, Sara L. ; Kerker, Bonnie D. ; Gwynn, R. Charon. / Awareness, treatment, and control of hypertension and hypercholesterolemia among insured residents of New York City, 2004. In: Preventing Chronic Disease. 2011 ; Vol. 8, No. 5.
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