Augmented glucose uptake and amino acid release by muscle underlying the burn wound and their moderation by ketone bodies

J. Turinsky, Robert Shangraw

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Glucose uptake and amino acid release by skeletal muscle from the burned and unburned regions of the body were compared in the presence or absence of ketone bodies. Rats were scalded on one hind limb and, 3 days later, soleus muscles from the burned and unburned limbs of burned rats as well as from controls were incubated in Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate medium with 10 mM glucose. Acetoacetate (5 mM) or β-hydroxybutyrate (10 mM) was included as necessary. In the absence of ketones, burned limb muscles took up, on the average, 85% (P <0.002) more glucose and released 110% (P <0.001) more alanine, 67% (P <0.002) more glutamate, and 54% (P <0.002) more glutamine than controls. The unburned limb muscles of burned rats usually did not differ from controls. Acetoacetate depressed glucose uptake in all groups of muscles by a comparable absolute amount, which represented a drop of 33% (P <0.02) in burned limb muscles and 64% (P <0.04) in both types of uninjured muscles. Alanine release was depressed about 15% (P <0.03) in all muscle groups. β-Hydroxybutyrate produced depressions in glucose uptake and alanine release by both types of uninjured muscles but similar effects on burned limb muscles were not statistically significant. Neither ketone had any appreciable effect on glutamate or glutamine release by any muscle group. It is concluded that glucose uptake and the release of alanine, glutamate, and glutamine are chronically increased in skeletal muscle from the burned but not the unburned region of the rat. Both acetoacetate and β-hydroxybutyrate depress glucose uptake and alanine release by muscle remote from the injured region but only acetoacetate exhibited this effect in metabolically altered muscle underlying the burn wound.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)338-346
Number of pages9
JournalExperimental and Molecular Pathology
Volume35
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1981
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Ketone Bodies
Muscle
Amino Acids
Glucose
Muscles
Wounds and Injuries
Alanine
Extremities
Hydroxybutyrates
Glutamine
Rats
Glutamic Acid
Skeletal Muscle
Ketones
Body Regions
Bicarbonates

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

Cite this

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title = "Augmented glucose uptake and amino acid release by muscle underlying the burn wound and their moderation by ketone bodies",
abstract = "Glucose uptake and amino acid release by skeletal muscle from the burned and unburned regions of the body were compared in the presence or absence of ketone bodies. Rats were scalded on one hind limb and, 3 days later, soleus muscles from the burned and unburned limbs of burned rats as well as from controls were incubated in Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate medium with 10 mM glucose. Acetoacetate (5 mM) or β-hydroxybutyrate (10 mM) was included as necessary. In the absence of ketones, burned limb muscles took up, on the average, 85{\%} (P <0.002) more glucose and released 110{\%} (P <0.001) more alanine, 67{\%} (P <0.002) more glutamate, and 54{\%} (P <0.002) more glutamine than controls. The unburned limb muscles of burned rats usually did not differ from controls. Acetoacetate depressed glucose uptake in all groups of muscles by a comparable absolute amount, which represented a drop of 33{\%} (P <0.02) in burned limb muscles and 64{\%} (P <0.04) in both types of uninjured muscles. Alanine release was depressed about 15{\%} (P <0.03) in all muscle groups. β-Hydroxybutyrate produced depressions in glucose uptake and alanine release by both types of uninjured muscles but similar effects on burned limb muscles were not statistically significant. Neither ketone had any appreciable effect on glutamate or glutamine release by any muscle group. It is concluded that glucose uptake and the release of alanine, glutamate, and glutamine are chronically increased in skeletal muscle from the burned but not the unburned region of the rat. Both acetoacetate and β-hydroxybutyrate depress glucose uptake and alanine release by muscle remote from the injured region but only acetoacetate exhibited this effect in metabolically altered muscle underlying the burn wound.",
author = "J. Turinsky and Robert Shangraw",
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T1 - Augmented glucose uptake and amino acid release by muscle underlying the burn wound and their moderation by ketone bodies

AU - Turinsky, J.

AU - Shangraw, Robert

PY - 1981

Y1 - 1981

N2 - Glucose uptake and amino acid release by skeletal muscle from the burned and unburned regions of the body were compared in the presence or absence of ketone bodies. Rats were scalded on one hind limb and, 3 days later, soleus muscles from the burned and unburned limbs of burned rats as well as from controls were incubated in Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate medium with 10 mM glucose. Acetoacetate (5 mM) or β-hydroxybutyrate (10 mM) was included as necessary. In the absence of ketones, burned limb muscles took up, on the average, 85% (P <0.002) more glucose and released 110% (P <0.001) more alanine, 67% (P <0.002) more glutamate, and 54% (P <0.002) more glutamine than controls. The unburned limb muscles of burned rats usually did not differ from controls. Acetoacetate depressed glucose uptake in all groups of muscles by a comparable absolute amount, which represented a drop of 33% (P <0.02) in burned limb muscles and 64% (P <0.04) in both types of uninjured muscles. Alanine release was depressed about 15% (P <0.03) in all muscle groups. β-Hydroxybutyrate produced depressions in glucose uptake and alanine release by both types of uninjured muscles but similar effects on burned limb muscles were not statistically significant. Neither ketone had any appreciable effect on glutamate or glutamine release by any muscle group. It is concluded that glucose uptake and the release of alanine, glutamate, and glutamine are chronically increased in skeletal muscle from the burned but not the unburned region of the rat. Both acetoacetate and β-hydroxybutyrate depress glucose uptake and alanine release by muscle remote from the injured region but only acetoacetate exhibited this effect in metabolically altered muscle underlying the burn wound.

AB - Glucose uptake and amino acid release by skeletal muscle from the burned and unburned regions of the body were compared in the presence or absence of ketone bodies. Rats were scalded on one hind limb and, 3 days later, soleus muscles from the burned and unburned limbs of burned rats as well as from controls were incubated in Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate medium with 10 mM glucose. Acetoacetate (5 mM) or β-hydroxybutyrate (10 mM) was included as necessary. In the absence of ketones, burned limb muscles took up, on the average, 85% (P <0.002) more glucose and released 110% (P <0.001) more alanine, 67% (P <0.002) more glutamate, and 54% (P <0.002) more glutamine than controls. The unburned limb muscles of burned rats usually did not differ from controls. Acetoacetate depressed glucose uptake in all groups of muscles by a comparable absolute amount, which represented a drop of 33% (P <0.02) in burned limb muscles and 64% (P <0.04) in both types of uninjured muscles. Alanine release was depressed about 15% (P <0.03) in all muscle groups. β-Hydroxybutyrate produced depressions in glucose uptake and alanine release by both types of uninjured muscles but similar effects on burned limb muscles were not statistically significant. Neither ketone had any appreciable effect on glutamate or glutamine release by any muscle group. It is concluded that glucose uptake and the release of alanine, glutamate, and glutamine are chronically increased in skeletal muscle from the burned but not the unburned region of the rat. Both acetoacetate and β-hydroxybutyrate depress glucose uptake and alanine release by muscle remote from the injured region but only acetoacetate exhibited this effect in metabolically altered muscle underlying the burn wound.

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