Attitudes, practices, and training on informed consent for transfusions and procedures

A survey of medical students and physicians

Sarah R. Vossoughi, Robert Macauley, Kathleen Sazama, Mark K. Fung

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: While many studies have demonstrated problems with informed consent in current practice, there remains controversy on how to address this. The aim of this study was to evaluate the opinions, attitudes, practices, and training for informed consent. Methods: Medical students, residents, advanced practice providers, and attending physicians at an academic institution were invited to complete a survey on informed consent for transfusions and procedures through an electronic platform. Results: Most (94%, n = 304) respondents indicated previous training in informed consent, only 60% (n = 192) felt the training was adequate, and 35% (n = 92) indicated difficulties with informed consent. When asked what would aid in obtaining consent, 59% (n = 189) selected a written guideline, and 36% (n = 117) selected patient simulation. Conclusions: Only 60% of respondents felt their informed consent training was adequate. Multiple areas of difficulty in obtaining proper informed consent were identified that should be addressed with focused training or written guidelines.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)315-321
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican journal of clinical pathology
Volume144
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015
Externally publishedYes

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Informed Consent
Medical Students
Physicians
Patient Simulation
Guidelines
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Education
  • Generalist
  • Special topics
  • Transfusion medicine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

Cite this

Attitudes, practices, and training on informed consent for transfusions and procedures : A survey of medical students and physicians. / Vossoughi, Sarah R.; Macauley, Robert; Sazama, Kathleen; Fung, Mark K.

In: American journal of clinical pathology, Vol. 144, No. 2, 01.01.2015, p. 315-321.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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