Attention deficits and hyperactivity-impulsivity: What have we learned, what next?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The domains of self-regulation, self-control, executive function, inattention, and impulsivity cut across broad swathes of normal and abnormal development. Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder is a common syndrome that encompasses a portion of these domains. In the past 25 years research on attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder has been characterized by dramatic advances in genetic, neural, and neuropsychological description of the syndrome as well as clarification of its multidimensional phenotypic structure. The limited clinical applicability of these research findings poses the primary challenge for the next generation. It is likely that clinical breakthroughs will require further refinement in describing heterogeneity or clinical/biological subgroups, renewed focus on the environment in the form of etiological events as well as psychosocial contexts of development, and integration of both with biological understanding.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1489-1503
Number of pages15
JournalDevelopment and Psychopathology
Volume25
Issue number4 PART 2
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2013

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Impulsive Behavior
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity
Executive Function
Research
Self-Control
Wells syndrome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Attention deficits and hyperactivity-impulsivity : What have we learned, what next? / Nigg, Joel.

In: Development and Psychopathology, Vol. 25, No. 4 PART 2, 11.2013, p. 1489-1503.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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