Associations of herbal and specialty supplements with lung and colorectal cancer risk in the VITamins and lifestyle study

Jessie A. Satia, Alyson Littman, Christopher G. Slatore, Joseph A. Galanko, Emily White

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

46 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Millions of Americans use dietary supplements with little knowledge about their benefits or risks. We examined associations of various herbal/specialty supplements with lung and colorectal cancer risk. Men and women, 50 to 76 years, in the VITamins And Lifestyle cohort completed a 24-page baseline questionnaire that captured duration (years) and frequency (days per week) of use of commonly used herbal/specialty supplements. Dose was not assessed due to the lack of accurate potency information. Supplement exposure was categorized as "no use" or "any use" over the previous 10 years. Hazard ratios (HR) were estimated by multivariate Cox regression models. Incident lung (n = 665) and colorectal cancers (n = 428) were obtained from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results cancer registry. Any use of glucosamine and chondroitin, which have anti-inflammatory properties, over the previous 10 years, was associated with significantly lower lung cancer risk: HR 0.74 [95% confidence interval (95% CI), 0.58-0.94] and HR 0.72 (95% CI, 0.54-0.96) and colorectal cancer risk: HR 0.73 (95% CI, 0.54-0.98) and HR 0.65 (95% CI, 0.45-0.93), respectively. There were also statistically significantly inverse associations of fish oil: HR 0.65 (95% CI, 0.42-0.99), methylsulfonylmethane: HR 0.46 (95% CI, 0.23-0.93), and St. John's wort: HR 0.35 (95% CI, 0.14-0.85) with colorectal cancer risk. In contrast, garlic pills were associated with a statistically significant 35% elevated colorectal cancer risk. These results suggest that some herbal/specialty supplements may be associated with lung and colorectal cancer risk; however, these products should be used with caution. Additional studies examining the effects of herbal/specialty supplements on risk for cancer and other diseases are needed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1419-1428
Number of pages10
JournalCancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention
Volume18
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2009
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Vitamins
Life Style
Colorectal Neoplasms
Lung Neoplasms
Confidence Intervals
Odds Ratio
Chondroitin
Hypericum
Garlic
Fish Oils
Glucosamine
Dietary Supplements
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Neoplasms
Epidemiology
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Lung

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Oncology

Cite this

Associations of herbal and specialty supplements with lung and colorectal cancer risk in the VITamins and lifestyle study. / Satia, Jessie A.; Littman, Alyson; Slatore, Christopher G.; Galanko, Joseph A.; White, Emily.

In: Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention, Vol. 18, No. 5, 05.2009, p. 1419-1428.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{b49c51fb0e9a4155bd73548c8ec02783,
title = "Associations of herbal and specialty supplements with lung and colorectal cancer risk in the VITamins and lifestyle study",
abstract = "Millions of Americans use dietary supplements with little knowledge about their benefits or risks. We examined associations of various herbal/specialty supplements with lung and colorectal cancer risk. Men and women, 50 to 76 years, in the VITamins And Lifestyle cohort completed a 24-page baseline questionnaire that captured duration (years) and frequency (days per week) of use of commonly used herbal/specialty supplements. Dose was not assessed due to the lack of accurate potency information. Supplement exposure was categorized as {"}no use{"} or {"}any use{"} over the previous 10 years. Hazard ratios (HR) were estimated by multivariate Cox regression models. Incident lung (n = 665) and colorectal cancers (n = 428) were obtained from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results cancer registry. Any use of glucosamine and chondroitin, which have anti-inflammatory properties, over the previous 10 years, was associated with significantly lower lung cancer risk: HR 0.74 [95{\%} confidence interval (95{\%} CI), 0.58-0.94] and HR 0.72 (95{\%} CI, 0.54-0.96) and colorectal cancer risk: HR 0.73 (95{\%} CI, 0.54-0.98) and HR 0.65 (95{\%} CI, 0.45-0.93), respectively. There were also statistically significantly inverse associations of fish oil: HR 0.65 (95{\%} CI, 0.42-0.99), methylsulfonylmethane: HR 0.46 (95{\%} CI, 0.23-0.93), and St. John's wort: HR 0.35 (95{\%} CI, 0.14-0.85) with colorectal cancer risk. In contrast, garlic pills were associated with a statistically significant 35{\%} elevated colorectal cancer risk. These results suggest that some herbal/specialty supplements may be associated with lung and colorectal cancer risk; however, these products should be used with caution. Additional studies examining the effects of herbal/specialty supplements on risk for cancer and other diseases are needed.",
author = "Satia, {Jessie A.} and Alyson Littman and Slatore, {Christopher G.} and Galanko, {Joseph A.} and Emily White",
year = "2009",
month = "5",
doi = "10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-09-0038",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "18",
pages = "1419--1428",
journal = "Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention",
issn = "1055-9965",
publisher = "American Association for Cancer Research Inc.",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Associations of herbal and specialty supplements with lung and colorectal cancer risk in the VITamins and lifestyle study

AU - Satia, Jessie A.

AU - Littman, Alyson

AU - Slatore, Christopher G.

AU - Galanko, Joseph A.

AU - White, Emily

PY - 2009/5

Y1 - 2009/5

N2 - Millions of Americans use dietary supplements with little knowledge about their benefits or risks. We examined associations of various herbal/specialty supplements with lung and colorectal cancer risk. Men and women, 50 to 76 years, in the VITamins And Lifestyle cohort completed a 24-page baseline questionnaire that captured duration (years) and frequency (days per week) of use of commonly used herbal/specialty supplements. Dose was not assessed due to the lack of accurate potency information. Supplement exposure was categorized as "no use" or "any use" over the previous 10 years. Hazard ratios (HR) were estimated by multivariate Cox regression models. Incident lung (n = 665) and colorectal cancers (n = 428) were obtained from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results cancer registry. Any use of glucosamine and chondroitin, which have anti-inflammatory properties, over the previous 10 years, was associated with significantly lower lung cancer risk: HR 0.74 [95% confidence interval (95% CI), 0.58-0.94] and HR 0.72 (95% CI, 0.54-0.96) and colorectal cancer risk: HR 0.73 (95% CI, 0.54-0.98) and HR 0.65 (95% CI, 0.45-0.93), respectively. There were also statistically significantly inverse associations of fish oil: HR 0.65 (95% CI, 0.42-0.99), methylsulfonylmethane: HR 0.46 (95% CI, 0.23-0.93), and St. John's wort: HR 0.35 (95% CI, 0.14-0.85) with colorectal cancer risk. In contrast, garlic pills were associated with a statistically significant 35% elevated colorectal cancer risk. These results suggest that some herbal/specialty supplements may be associated with lung and colorectal cancer risk; however, these products should be used with caution. Additional studies examining the effects of herbal/specialty supplements on risk for cancer and other diseases are needed.

AB - Millions of Americans use dietary supplements with little knowledge about their benefits or risks. We examined associations of various herbal/specialty supplements with lung and colorectal cancer risk. Men and women, 50 to 76 years, in the VITamins And Lifestyle cohort completed a 24-page baseline questionnaire that captured duration (years) and frequency (days per week) of use of commonly used herbal/specialty supplements. Dose was not assessed due to the lack of accurate potency information. Supplement exposure was categorized as "no use" or "any use" over the previous 10 years. Hazard ratios (HR) were estimated by multivariate Cox regression models. Incident lung (n = 665) and colorectal cancers (n = 428) were obtained from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results cancer registry. Any use of glucosamine and chondroitin, which have anti-inflammatory properties, over the previous 10 years, was associated with significantly lower lung cancer risk: HR 0.74 [95% confidence interval (95% CI), 0.58-0.94] and HR 0.72 (95% CI, 0.54-0.96) and colorectal cancer risk: HR 0.73 (95% CI, 0.54-0.98) and HR 0.65 (95% CI, 0.45-0.93), respectively. There were also statistically significantly inverse associations of fish oil: HR 0.65 (95% CI, 0.42-0.99), methylsulfonylmethane: HR 0.46 (95% CI, 0.23-0.93), and St. John's wort: HR 0.35 (95% CI, 0.14-0.85) with colorectal cancer risk. In contrast, garlic pills were associated with a statistically significant 35% elevated colorectal cancer risk. These results suggest that some herbal/specialty supplements may be associated with lung and colorectal cancer risk; however, these products should be used with caution. Additional studies examining the effects of herbal/specialty supplements on risk for cancer and other diseases are needed.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=66549096969&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=66549096969&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-09-0038

DO - 10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-09-0038

M3 - Article

C2 - 19423520

AN - SCOPUS:66549096969

VL - 18

SP - 1419

EP - 1428

JO - Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention

JF - Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention

SN - 1055-9965

IS - 5

ER -