Association of Obesity Subtypes in the Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery Study and 3-Year Postoperative Weight Change

Alison E. Field, Thomas H. Inge, Steven H. Belle, Geoffrey S. Johnson, Abdus S. Wahed, Walter J. Pories, Konstantinos Spaniolas, James E. Mitchell, Alfons Pomp, Gregory F. Dakin, Bruce Wolfe, Anita P. Courcoulas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The study objective was to empirically identify subgroups of patients with obesity and investigate their association with postoperative weight change. Methods: A longitudinal analysis of 2,458 adults in the Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery (LABS) study was used. Baseline data were used to identify subgroups. The outcome was 3-year weight change after bariatric surgery. Results: We identified four classes (subtypes) of obesity, which could be characterized as diabetes with low rates of high-density lipoprotein (Class 1), disordered eating (Class 2), mixed (Class 3), and extreme obesity with early onset (Class 4). Approximately 98% of participants in Class 1 had diabetes compared with < 40% in the other classes. There were high rates of binge eating in Class 2, and more than 92% of those in this class reported eating when not hungry. Class 4 was characterized by a higher BMI at baseline. Adults in Class 4 lost an average of 25.0% (males) and 30.3% (females) of their baseline weight over 3 years. In contrast with participants in Class 1, those in Classes 2 and 3 had significantly larger 3-year weight losses than their peers in Class 4. Conclusions: Obesity is a heterogeneous disease. Bariatric surgery may be most beneficial for adults with disordered eating.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1931-1937
Number of pages7
JournalObesity
Volume26
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2018

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Bariatric Surgery
Obesity
Weights and Measures
Eating
Bulimia
Weight Loss

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Endocrinology
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Field, A. E., Inge, T. H., Belle, S. H., Johnson, G. S., Wahed, A. S., Pories, W. J., ... Courcoulas, A. P. (2018). Association of Obesity Subtypes in the Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery Study and 3-Year Postoperative Weight Change. Obesity, 26(12), 1931-1937. https://doi.org/10.1002/oby.22287

Association of Obesity Subtypes in the Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery Study and 3-Year Postoperative Weight Change. / Field, Alison E.; Inge, Thomas H.; Belle, Steven H.; Johnson, Geoffrey S.; Wahed, Abdus S.; Pories, Walter J.; Spaniolas, Konstantinos; Mitchell, James E.; Pomp, Alfons; Dakin, Gregory F.; Wolfe, Bruce; Courcoulas, Anita P.

In: Obesity, Vol. 26, No. 12, 01.12.2018, p. 1931-1937.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Field, AE, Inge, TH, Belle, SH, Johnson, GS, Wahed, AS, Pories, WJ, Spaniolas, K, Mitchell, JE, Pomp, A, Dakin, GF, Wolfe, B & Courcoulas, AP 2018, 'Association of Obesity Subtypes in the Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery Study and 3-Year Postoperative Weight Change', Obesity, vol. 26, no. 12, pp. 1931-1937. https://doi.org/10.1002/oby.22287
Field, Alison E. ; Inge, Thomas H. ; Belle, Steven H. ; Johnson, Geoffrey S. ; Wahed, Abdus S. ; Pories, Walter J. ; Spaniolas, Konstantinos ; Mitchell, James E. ; Pomp, Alfons ; Dakin, Gregory F. ; Wolfe, Bruce ; Courcoulas, Anita P. / Association of Obesity Subtypes in the Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery Study and 3-Year Postoperative Weight Change. In: Obesity. 2018 ; Vol. 26, No. 12. pp. 1931-1937.
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