Association between documented family history of cancer and screening for breast and colorectal cancer

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Abstract

Background: Previous research on ascertainment of cancer family history and cancer screening has been conducted in urban settings. Purpose: To examine whether documented family history of breast or colorectal cancer is associated with breast or colorectal cancer screening. Methods: Medical record reviews were conducted on 3433 patients aged 55 and older from four primary care practices in two rural Oregon communities. Data collected included patient demographic and risk information, including any documentation of family history of breast or colorectal cancer, and receipt of screening for these cancers. Results: A positive breast cancer family history was associated with an increased likelihood of being up-to-date for mammography screening (OR 2.09, 95% CI 1.45-3.00 relative to a recorded negative history). A positive family history for colorectal cancer was associated with an increased likelihood of being up-to-date with colorectal cancer screening according to U.S. Preventive Services Task Force low risk guidelines for males (OR 2.89, 95% CI 1.15-7.29) and females (OR 2.47, 95% CI 1.32-4.64) relative to a recorded negative family history. The absence of any recorded family cancer history was associated with a decreased likelihood of being up-to-date for mammography screening (OR 0.70, 95% CI 0.56-0.88 relative to recorded negative history) or for colorectal cancer screening (OR 0.75, 95% CI 0.60-0.96 in females, OR 0.68, 95% CI 0.53-0.88 in males relative to recorded negative history). Conclusion: Further research is needed to determine if establishing routines to document family history of cancer would improve appropriate use of cancer screening.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)679-684
Number of pages6
JournalPreventive Medicine
Volume57
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2013

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Early Detection of Cancer
Colorectal Neoplasms
Breast Neoplasms
History
Mammography
Neoplasms
Rural Population
Advisory Committees
Research
Documentation
Medical Records
Primary Health Care
Demography
Guidelines

Keywords

  • Cancer risk
  • Cancer screening
  • Early detection of cancer

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Epidemiology

Cite this

@article{39fca6e5dc4f4579bc94be09ce5f8b03,
title = "Association between documented family history of cancer and screening for breast and colorectal cancer",
abstract = "Background: Previous research on ascertainment of cancer family history and cancer screening has been conducted in urban settings. Purpose: To examine whether documented family history of breast or colorectal cancer is associated with breast or colorectal cancer screening. Methods: Medical record reviews were conducted on 3433 patients aged 55 and older from four primary care practices in two rural Oregon communities. Data collected included patient demographic and risk information, including any documentation of family history of breast or colorectal cancer, and receipt of screening for these cancers. Results: A positive breast cancer family history was associated with an increased likelihood of being up-to-date for mammography screening (OR 2.09, 95{\%} CI 1.45-3.00 relative to a recorded negative history). A positive family history for colorectal cancer was associated with an increased likelihood of being up-to-date with colorectal cancer screening according to U.S. Preventive Services Task Force low risk guidelines for males (OR 2.89, 95{\%} CI 1.15-7.29) and females (OR 2.47, 95{\%} CI 1.32-4.64) relative to a recorded negative family history. The absence of any recorded family cancer history was associated with a decreased likelihood of being up-to-date for mammography screening (OR 0.70, 95{\%} CI 0.56-0.88 relative to recorded negative history) or for colorectal cancer screening (OR 0.75, 95{\%} CI 0.60-0.96 in females, OR 0.68, 95{\%} CI 0.53-0.88 in males relative to recorded negative history). Conclusion: Further research is needed to determine if establishing routines to document family history of cancer would improve appropriate use of cancer screening.",
keywords = "Cancer risk, Cancer screening, Early detection of cancer",
author = "Carney, {Patricia (Patty)} and O'Malley, {Jean P.} and Andrea Gough and David Buckley and James Wallace and Lyle Fagnan and Cynthia Morris and Mori, {Motomi (Tomi)} and John Heintzman and David Lieberman",
year = "2013",
month = "11",
doi = "10.1016/j.ypmed.2013.08.031",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "57",
pages = "679--684",
journal = "Preventive Medicine",
issn = "0091-7435",
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number = "5",

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TY - JOUR

T1 - Association between documented family history of cancer and screening for breast and colorectal cancer

AU - Carney, Patricia (Patty)

AU - O'Malley, Jean P.

AU - Gough, Andrea

AU - Buckley, David

AU - Wallace, James

AU - Fagnan, Lyle

AU - Morris, Cynthia

AU - Mori, Motomi (Tomi)

AU - Heintzman, John

AU - Lieberman, David

PY - 2013/11

Y1 - 2013/11

N2 - Background: Previous research on ascertainment of cancer family history and cancer screening has been conducted in urban settings. Purpose: To examine whether documented family history of breast or colorectal cancer is associated with breast or colorectal cancer screening. Methods: Medical record reviews were conducted on 3433 patients aged 55 and older from four primary care practices in two rural Oregon communities. Data collected included patient demographic and risk information, including any documentation of family history of breast or colorectal cancer, and receipt of screening for these cancers. Results: A positive breast cancer family history was associated with an increased likelihood of being up-to-date for mammography screening (OR 2.09, 95% CI 1.45-3.00 relative to a recorded negative history). A positive family history for colorectal cancer was associated with an increased likelihood of being up-to-date with colorectal cancer screening according to U.S. Preventive Services Task Force low risk guidelines for males (OR 2.89, 95% CI 1.15-7.29) and females (OR 2.47, 95% CI 1.32-4.64) relative to a recorded negative family history. The absence of any recorded family cancer history was associated with a decreased likelihood of being up-to-date for mammography screening (OR 0.70, 95% CI 0.56-0.88 relative to recorded negative history) or for colorectal cancer screening (OR 0.75, 95% CI 0.60-0.96 in females, OR 0.68, 95% CI 0.53-0.88 in males relative to recorded negative history). Conclusion: Further research is needed to determine if establishing routines to document family history of cancer would improve appropriate use of cancer screening.

AB - Background: Previous research on ascertainment of cancer family history and cancer screening has been conducted in urban settings. Purpose: To examine whether documented family history of breast or colorectal cancer is associated with breast or colorectal cancer screening. Methods: Medical record reviews were conducted on 3433 patients aged 55 and older from four primary care practices in two rural Oregon communities. Data collected included patient demographic and risk information, including any documentation of family history of breast or colorectal cancer, and receipt of screening for these cancers. Results: A positive breast cancer family history was associated with an increased likelihood of being up-to-date for mammography screening (OR 2.09, 95% CI 1.45-3.00 relative to a recorded negative history). A positive family history for colorectal cancer was associated with an increased likelihood of being up-to-date with colorectal cancer screening according to U.S. Preventive Services Task Force low risk guidelines for males (OR 2.89, 95% CI 1.15-7.29) and females (OR 2.47, 95% CI 1.32-4.64) relative to a recorded negative family history. The absence of any recorded family cancer history was associated with a decreased likelihood of being up-to-date for mammography screening (OR 0.70, 95% CI 0.56-0.88 relative to recorded negative history) or for colorectal cancer screening (OR 0.75, 95% CI 0.60-0.96 in females, OR 0.68, 95% CI 0.53-0.88 in males relative to recorded negative history). Conclusion: Further research is needed to determine if establishing routines to document family history of cancer would improve appropriate use of cancer screening.

KW - Cancer risk

KW - Cancer screening

KW - Early detection of cancer

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U2 - 10.1016/j.ypmed.2013.08.031

DO - 10.1016/j.ypmed.2013.08.031

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VL - 57

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JO - Preventive Medicine

JF - Preventive Medicine

SN - 0091-7435

IS - 5

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