Association between childhood school segregation and changes in adult sense of control in the african american health cohort

Fredric D. Wolinsky, Theodore K. Malmstrom, J. Phillip Miller, Elena Andresen, Mario Schootman, Douglas K. Miller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective. Cross-sectional associations between childhood school segregation and adult sense of control and physical performance have been established in the African American Health (AAH) cohort. Here we extend that work by estimating the association between childhood school segregation and 2-year changes in adult sense of control. Method. Complete data on 541 older AAH men and women were used to estimate the association between childhood school segregation and changes in the sense of control. Exposure to segregation was self-reported in 2004, and the sense of control was measured in 2008 and 2010 using Blom rank transformations of Mirowsky and Ross' 8-item scale. Declining subjective income and experiencing major life stressors between 2008 and 2010, as well as traditional covariates (demographic factors, socioeconomic status, self-rated health, racial attitudes and beliefs, and religiosity) were included for statistical adjustment. Multiple linear regression analysis with propensity score reweighting was used. Results. Receiving the majority of one's primary and secondary education in segregated schools had a significant net positive association (d = 0.179; p = .029) with 2-year changes in adult sense of control. Conclusion. AAH participants receiving the majority of their primary and secondary educations in segregated schools appeared to have been protected, in part, from age-related declines in the sense of control.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)956-962
Number of pages7
JournalJournals of Gerontology - Series B Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences
Volume68
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2013

Fingerprint

African Americans
segregation
childhood
Health
health
school
primary education
secondary education
Men's Health
Attitude to Health
Education
Social Adjustment
Propensity Score
Women's Health
Social Class
demographic factors
Linear Models
Regression Analysis
Demography
American

Keywords

  • African americans
  • Longitudinal cohort
  • School segregation
  • Sense of control

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Gerontology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Social Psychology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Association between childhood school segregation and changes in adult sense of control in the african american health cohort. / Wolinsky, Fredric D.; Malmstrom, Theodore K.; Miller, J. Phillip; Andresen, Elena; Schootman, Mario; Miller, Douglas K.

In: Journals of Gerontology - Series B Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences, Vol. 68, No. 6, 11.2013, p. 956-962.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wolinsky, Fredric D. ; Malmstrom, Theodore K. ; Miller, J. Phillip ; Andresen, Elena ; Schootman, Mario ; Miller, Douglas K. / Association between childhood school segregation and changes in adult sense of control in the african american health cohort. In: Journals of Gerontology - Series B Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences. 2013 ; Vol. 68, No. 6. pp. 956-962.
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