Assessing the anticipated consequences of Computer-based Provider Order Entry at three community hospitals using an open-ended, semi-structured survey instrument

Dean F. Sittig, Joan Ash, Ken P. Guappone, Emily M. Campbell, Richard H. Dykstra

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To determine what "average" clinicians in organizations that were about to implement Computer-based Provider Order Entry (CPOE) were expecting to occur, we conducted an open-ended, semi-structured survey at three community hospitals. Methods: We created an open-ended, semi-structured, interview survey template that we customized for each organization. This interview-based survey was designed to be administered orally to clinicians and take approximately 5 min to complete, although clinicians were allowed to discuss as many advantages or disadvantages of the impending system roll-out as they wanted to. Results: Our survey findings did not reveal any overly negative, critical, problematic, or striking sets of concerns. However, from the standpoint of unintended consequences, we found that clinicians were anticipating only a few of the events, emotions, and process changes that are likely to result from CPOE. Conclusions: The results of such an open-ended survey may prove useful in helping CPOE leaders to understand user perceptions and predictions about CPOE, because it can expose issues about which more communication, or discussion, is needed. Using the survey, implementation strategies and management techniques outlined in this paper, any chief information officer (CIO) or chief medical information officer (CMIO) should be able to adequately assess their organization's CPOE readiness, make the necessary mid-course corrections, and be prepared to deal with the currently identified unintended consequences of CPOE should they occur.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)440-447
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Journal of Medical Informatics
Volume77
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2008

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Community Hospital
Interviews
Surveys and Questionnaires
Emotions
Communication

Keywords

  • Community
  • Ethnology
  • Hospitals
  • Medical informatics
  • Medical Order Entry Systems

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Assessing the anticipated consequences of Computer-based Provider Order Entry at three community hospitals using an open-ended, semi-structured survey instrument. / Sittig, Dean F.; Ash, Joan; Guappone, Ken P.; Campbell, Emily M.; Dykstra, Richard H.

In: International Journal of Medical Informatics, Vol. 77, No. 7, 07.2008, p. 440-447.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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