Assessing breast cancer risk in women

Elizabeth Steiner, David Klubert, Doug Knutson

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    14 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Understanding modifiable and nonmodifiable factors that increase or decrease breast cancer risk allows family physicians to counsel women appropriately. Nonmodifiable factors associated with increased breast cancer risk include advanced age, female sex, family history of breast cancer, increased breast density, genetic predisposition, menarche before age 12 years, and natural menopause after age 45 years. Hormonal factors associated with breast cancer include advanced age at first pregnancy, exposure to diethylstilbestrol, and hormone therapy. Environmental factors include therapeutic radiation. Obesity is also associated with increased rates of breast cancer. Factors associated with decreased cancer rates include pregnancy at an early age, late menarche, early menopause, high parity, and use of some medications, such as selective estrogen receptor modulators and, possibly, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents and aspirin. No convincing evidence supports the use of dietary interventions for the prevention of breast cancer, with the exception of limiting alcohol intake.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)1361-1366
    Number of pages6
    JournalAmerican Family Physician
    Volume78
    Issue number12
    StatePublished - Dec 15 2008

    Fingerprint

    Breast Neoplasms
    Menarche
    Menopause
    Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulators
    Diethylstilbestrol
    Family Physicians
    Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Agents
    Pregnancy Rate
    Genetic Predisposition to Disease
    Parity
    Aspirin
    Obesity
    Alcohols
    Hormones
    Radiation
    Pregnancy
    Therapeutics
    Neoplasms

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Family Practice

    Cite this

    Steiner, E., Klubert, D., & Knutson, D. (2008). Assessing breast cancer risk in women. American Family Physician, 78(12), 1361-1366.

    Assessing breast cancer risk in women. / Steiner, Elizabeth; Klubert, David; Knutson, Doug.

    In: American Family Physician, Vol. 78, No. 12, 15.12.2008, p. 1361-1366.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Steiner, E, Klubert, D & Knutson, D 2008, 'Assessing breast cancer risk in women', American Family Physician, vol. 78, no. 12, pp. 1361-1366.
    Steiner E, Klubert D, Knutson D. Assessing breast cancer risk in women. American Family Physician. 2008 Dec 15;78(12):1361-1366.
    Steiner, Elizabeth ; Klubert, David ; Knutson, Doug. / Assessing breast cancer risk in women. In: American Family Physician. 2008 ; Vol. 78, No. 12. pp. 1361-1366.
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