ART adherence changes among patients in community substance use treatment: a preliminary analysis from MACH14

Marc I. Rosen, Anne C. Black, Julia H. Arnsten, Jane M. Simoni, Glann J. Wagner, Kathleen Goggin, Robert H. Remien, Carol E. Golin, Yan Wang, David Bangsberg, Honghu H. Liu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Opiate substitution treatment has been associated with better adherence to lifesaving antiretroviral medications, but the impact of other substance abuse treatment on adherence is unknown.Findings: In this study, 215 patients who had been in adherence-focused research studies provided electronically-measured adherence data and a measure of whether the patient had recently been in substance abuse treatment. Recent engagement in substance abuse treatment was independently associated with significantly higher adherence, after covarying for recent substance use and other factors potentially affecting adherence.Conclusions: The findings suggest that substance abuse treatment is associated with better adherence. Potential mechanisms by which substance abuse treatment improves adherence, such as more stability or more future-orientation, require further study.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number30
JournalAIDS Research and Therapy
Volume9
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 11 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Substance-Related Disorders
Opiate Substitution Treatment
Therapeutics
Research

Keywords

  • AIDS
  • Medication adherence
  • Substance abuse
  • Treatment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Virology
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Rosen, M. I., Black, A. C., Arnsten, J. H., Simoni, J. M., Wagner, G. J., Goggin, K., ... Liu, H. H. (2012). ART adherence changes among patients in community substance use treatment: a preliminary analysis from MACH14. AIDS Research and Therapy, 9, [30]. https://doi.org/10.1186/1742-6405-9-30

ART adherence changes among patients in community substance use treatment : a preliminary analysis from MACH14. / Rosen, Marc I.; Black, Anne C.; Arnsten, Julia H.; Simoni, Jane M.; Wagner, Glann J.; Goggin, Kathleen; Remien, Robert H.; Golin, Carol E.; Wang, Yan; Bangsberg, David; Liu, Honghu H.

In: AIDS Research and Therapy, Vol. 9, 30, 11.10.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rosen, MI, Black, AC, Arnsten, JH, Simoni, JM, Wagner, GJ, Goggin, K, Remien, RH, Golin, CE, Wang, Y, Bangsberg, D & Liu, HH 2012, 'ART adherence changes among patients in community substance use treatment: a preliminary analysis from MACH14', AIDS Research and Therapy, vol. 9, 30. https://doi.org/10.1186/1742-6405-9-30
Rosen, Marc I. ; Black, Anne C. ; Arnsten, Julia H. ; Simoni, Jane M. ; Wagner, Glann J. ; Goggin, Kathleen ; Remien, Robert H. ; Golin, Carol E. ; Wang, Yan ; Bangsberg, David ; Liu, Honghu H. / ART adherence changes among patients in community substance use treatment : a preliminary analysis from MACH14. In: AIDS Research and Therapy. 2012 ; Vol. 9.
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AU - Remien, Robert H.

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