Aroma Effects on Physiologic and Cognitive Function Following Acute Stress: A Mechanism Investigation

Irina Chamine, Barry Oken

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Aromas may improve physiologic and cognitive function after stress, but associated mechanisms remain unknown. This study evaluated the effects of lavender aroma, which is commonly used for stress reduction, on physiologic and cognitive functions. The contribution of pharmacologic, hedonic, and expectancy-related mechanisms of the aromatherapy effects was evaluated. Methods: Ninety-two healthy adults (mean age, 58.0 years; 79.3% women) were randomly assigned to three aroma groups (lavender, perceptible placebo [coconut], and nonperceptible placebo [water] and to two prime subgroups (primed, with a suggestion of inhaling a powerful stress-reducing aroma, or no prime). Participants' performance on a battery of cognitive tests, physiologic responses, and subjective stress were evaluated at baseline and after exposure to a stress battery during which aromatherapy was present. Participants also rated the intensity and pleasantness of their assigned aroma. Results: Pharmacologic effects of lavender but not placebo aromas significantly benefited post-stress performance on the working memory task (F(2, 86) = 5.41; p = 0.006). Increased expectancy due to positive prime, regardless of aroma type, facilitated post-stress performance on the processing speed task (F(1, 87) = 8.31; p = 0.005). Aroma hedonics (pleasantness and intensity) played a role in the beneficial lavender effect on working memory and physiologic function. Conclusions: The observable aroma effects were produced by a combination of mechanisms involving aroma-specific pharmacologic properties, aroma hedonic properties, and participant expectations. In the future, each of these mechanisms could be manipulated to produce optimal functioning.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)713-721
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine
Volume22
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2016

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Lavandula
Cognition
Pleasure
Aromatherapy
Placebos
Short-Term Memory
Cocos
Inhalation
Water

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Complementary and alternative medicine

Cite this

Aroma Effects on Physiologic and Cognitive Function Following Acute Stress : A Mechanism Investigation. / Chamine, Irina; Oken, Barry.

In: Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, Vol. 22, No. 9, 01.09.2016, p. 713-721.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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