Are women who are treated for hypothyroidism at risk for pregnancy complications?

Tina O. Tan, Yvonne W. Cheng, Aaron Caughey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the outcomes that are associated with pregnancy and treated hypothyroidism. Study design: This was a retrospective cohort study of all women who received prenatal care and were delivered at the University of California, San Francisco, between 1989 and 2001. All patients with hypothyroidism diagnosed before pregnancy or early in pregnancy were identified. Maternal, fetal, and obstetric outcomes were then collected and analyzed for women with hypothyroidism and compared with women without hypothyroidism. Results: Among 20,499 deliveries, there were 419 women (2.1%) who were treated for hypothyroidism during the study period. Hypothyroidism was more common among women ≥35 years old, white women, and women without Medicaid insurance. Treated hypothyroidism was not associated with any increase in maternal, fetal, or neonatal complications. In addition, hypothyroidism did not affect mode of delivery. Conclusion: Compared with patients without hypothyroidism, patients with treated hypothyroidism are not at any increased risk for perinatal morbidity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume194
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2006
Externally publishedYes

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Pregnancy Complications
Hypothyroidism
Pregnancy
Mothers
Prenatal Care
San Francisco
Medicaid
Insurance
Obstetrics
Cohort Studies
Retrospective Studies
Morbidity

Keywords

  • Hypothyroidism
  • Pregnancy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Are women who are treated for hypothyroidism at risk for pregnancy complications? / Tan, Tina O.; Cheng, Yvonne W.; Caughey, Aaron.

In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vol. 194, No. 5, 05.2006.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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