Are there lessons to be learned from drug development that will accelerate the use of molecular imaging probes in the clinic?

William C. Eckelman, Shashank Rohatagi, Kenneth Krohn, David R. Vera

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This special issue of the journal contains contributions from participants of the third La Jolla meeting (The Magic Bullet: A Century Later). The goal of this meeting was twofold: to review approaches to validating molecular imaging agents and to review the progress in advancing the use of molecular imaging from the bench to the bedside, with a special emphasis on how molecular imaging improves patient care and management. Drug development has changed its focus over the years. The original approach depended on direct measurements in patients, whereby, in many cases, the drug was advanced to an NDA based on physiological results (e.g., lowering blood pressure) without identifying a target. Over the past decade, the focus has been on validating a target and choosing the lead compound using combinatorial chemistry and high throughput screening, often at the expense of a focus on the biology of diseases. On the other hand, molecular imaging has been target based since its beginning because of the requirements dictated by external imaging (i.e., a target-to-nontarget ratio). This article explores the possible analogies between current targeted drug development and molecular imaging-targeted probe development with the goal of better defining the path to new molecular imaging probes for the clinic.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)657-662
Number of pages6
JournalNuclear Medicine and Biology
Volume32
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2005
Externally publishedYes

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Molecular Probes
Molecular Imaging
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Patient Care Management
Magic
Blood Pressure

Keywords

  • Molecular imaging
  • Radioligands
  • Receptor binding radiotracer
  • Translational medicine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Are there lessons to be learned from drug development that will accelerate the use of molecular imaging probes in the clinic? / Eckelman, William C.; Rohatagi, Shashank; Krohn, Kenneth; Vera, David R.

In: Nuclear Medicine and Biology, Vol. 32, No. 7, 10.2005, p. 657-662.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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