Are pediatricians complicit in Vitamin K deficiency bleeding?

Melissa Weddle, Allison Empey, Eric Crossen, Aaron Green, Joy Green, Carrie Phillipi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that all newborns receive a single dose of intramuscular Vitamin K to prevent Vitamin K deficiency bleeding. How should the clinician respond when parents decline Vitamin K? Although Vitamin K deficiency bleeding can have devastating sequelae, they are uncommon; therefore, parents are generally allowed to decline Vitamin K after counseling is provided. When parents ask for a Vitamin K preparation of unproven effectiveness, should the clinician honor that request? To address these questions, we present a case of a healthy newborn whose parents declined intramuscular Vitamin K and requested an oral preparation. Two general pediatricians discuss the medical and ethical issues these situations pose, and the parents describe their experience.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)753-757
Number of pages5
JournalPediatrics
Volume136
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2015

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Vitamin K Deficiency Bleeding
Vitamin K
Parents
Newborn Infant
Ethics
Counseling
Pediatricians
Pediatrics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Are pediatricians complicit in Vitamin K deficiency bleeding? / Weddle, Melissa; Empey, Allison; Crossen, Eric; Green, Aaron; Green, Joy; Phillipi, Carrie.

In: Pediatrics, Vol. 136, No. 4, 01.10.2015, p. 753-757.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Weddle, Melissa ; Empey, Allison ; Crossen, Eric ; Green, Aaron ; Green, Joy ; Phillipi, Carrie. / Are pediatricians complicit in Vitamin K deficiency bleeding?. In: Pediatrics. 2015 ; Vol. 136, No. 4. pp. 753-757.
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