Are pediatric quality care measures too stringent?

Allison Casciato, Heather Angier, Christina Milano, Nicholas Gideonse, Rachel Gold, Jennifer Devoe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: We aimed to demonstrate the application of national pediatric quality measures, derived from claims-based data, for use with electronic medical record data, and determine the extent to which rates differ if specifications were modified to allow for flexibility in measuring receipt of care. Methods: We reviewed electronic medical record data for all patients up to 15 years of age with ≥1 office visit to a safety net family medicine clinic in 2010 (n = 1544). We assessed rates of appropriate well-child visits, immunizations, and body mass index (BMI) documentation, defined strictly by national guidelines versus by guidelines with clinically relevant modifications. Results: Among children aged

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)686-693
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of the American Board of Family Medicine
Volume25
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2012

Fingerprint

Electronic Health Records
Quality of Health Care
Guidelines
Pediatrics
Office Visits
Documentation
Immunization
Body Mass Index
Medicine
Safety

Keywords

  • Community health networks
  • Electronic health records
  • Low-income population
  • Pediatrics
  • Quality of health care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Family Practice

Cite this

Are pediatric quality care measures too stringent? / Casciato, Allison; Angier, Heather; Milano, Christina; Gideonse, Nicholas; Gold, Rachel; Devoe, Jennifer.

In: Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine, Vol. 25, No. 5, 09.2012, p. 686-693.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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