Are omega-3 fatty acids the most important nutritional modulators of coronary heart disease risk?

William Harris

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

With each passing year, the evidence linking an increased risk for coronary heart disease (CHD) death with a chronic dietary deficiency in long-chain omega-3 (n-3) fatty acids (FAs) grows stronger. Recently, a federally mandated evidence-based review in the United States concluded that n-3 FAs, especially eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), have clear cardioprotective effects, and national and international expert panels and health organizations have begun to call for increased EPA and DHA intakes. Consumption of between 450 and 1000 mg/d is recommended for those without and with known CHD, respectively. Based on animal and isolated cell studies, these FAs were presumed to have antiarrhythmic effects. The first direct evidence for this in humans was recently published, as were new data linking low n-3 FA intakes with risk for developing atrial fibrillation. The strength of the n-3 story has now led to a proposal that blood levels of EPA plus DHA be considered a new, modifiable, and clinically relevant risk factor for death from CHD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)447-452
Number of pages6
JournalCurrent Atherosclerosis Reports
Volume6
Issue number6
StatePublished - Nov 2004
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Eicosapentaenoic Acid
Docosahexaenoic Acids
Omega-3 Fatty Acids
Coronary Disease
Atrial Fibrillation
Fatty Acids
Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Are omega-3 fatty acids the most important nutritional modulators of coronary heart disease risk? / Harris, William.

In: Current Atherosclerosis Reports, Vol. 6, No. 6, 11.2004, p. 447-452.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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