Are human neurodegenerative disorders linked to environmental chemicals with excitotoxic properties

Peter Spencer, A. C. Ludolph, G. E. Kisby

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

At the present time, it seems unlikely that progressive neurodegenerative diseases, such as ALS, Parkinson's disease, and dementia of the Alzheimer type, are triggered by environmental agents with excitotoxic potential. These include excitotoxic agents that behave as glutamate agonists or disrupt energy metabolism: both types elicit permanent but self-limiting neuronal diseases with patterns of neuronal deficit that reflect selective chemical exposure (MPP+ and parkinsonism), differential susceptibility to energy dysmetabolism (NPA and dystonia), or the distribution of glutamate-receptors (domoic acid and memory loss). If environmental agents play an etiologic role in progressive neurodegenerative diseases, they are likely to target a critical, irreplaceable neuronal molecule that is required to maintain long- term neuronal integrity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)154-160
Number of pages7
JournalAnnals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Volume648
StatePublished - 1992

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Neurodegenerative Diseases
Neurodegenerative diseases
Excitatory Amino Acid Agonists
Dystonia
Memory Disorders
Glutamate Receptors
Parkinsonian Disorders
Energy Metabolism
Parkinson Disease
Alzheimer Disease
Data storage equipment
Molecules
Energy
domoic acid
Susceptibility
Alzheimer
Metabolism
Parkinson's Disease
Integrity
Dementia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Are human neurodegenerative disorders linked to environmental chemicals with excitotoxic properties. / Spencer, Peter; Ludolph, A. C.; Kisby, G. E.

In: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, Vol. 648, 1992, p. 154-160.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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