Applying Gene Silencing Technology to Contraception

Gregory Dissen, Alejandro Lomniczi, R. L. Boudreau, Y. H. Chen, B. L. Davidson, Sergio Ojeda

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    6 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Contents: Population control of feral animals is often difficult, as it can be dangerous for the animals, labour intensive and expensive. Therefore, a useful tool for control of animal populations would be a non-surgical method to induce sterility. Our laboratories utilize methods aimed at targeting brain cells in vivo with vehicles that deliver a payload of either inhibitory RNAs or genes intended to correct cellular dysfunction. A useful framework for design of a new approach will be the combination of these methods with the intended goal to produce a technique that can be used to non-invasively sterilize cats and dogs. For this approach to succeed, it has to meet several conditions: the target gene must be essential for fertility; the method must include a mechanism to effectively and specifically silence the gene of interest; the method of delivering the silencing agent must be minimally invasive, and finally, the silencing effect must be sustained for the lifespan of the target species, so that expansion of the population can be effectively prevented. In this article, we discuss our work to develop gene silencing technology to induce sterility; we will use examples of our previous studies demonstrating that this approach is viable. These studies include (i) the use of viral vectors able to disrupt reproductive cyclicity when delivered to the regions of the brain involved in the control of reproduction and (ii) experiments with viral vectors that are able to ameliorate neuronal disease when delivered systemically using a novel approach of gene therapy.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)381-386
    Number of pages6
    JournalReproduction in Domestic Animals
    Volume47
    Issue numberSUPPL. 6
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Dec 2012

    Fingerprint

    contraception
    Gene Silencing
    gene silencing
    Contraception
    Technology
    Infertility
    feral animals
    Genes
    brain
    methodology
    gene therapy
    Population Control
    genes
    Brain
    Periodicity
    periodicity
    Genetic Therapy
    laboratory techniques
    Population
    Reproduction

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Animal Science and Zoology
    • Biotechnology
    • Endocrinology

    Cite this

    Applying Gene Silencing Technology to Contraception. / Dissen, Gregory; Lomniczi, Alejandro; Boudreau, R. L.; Chen, Y. H.; Davidson, B. L.; Ojeda, Sergio.

    In: Reproduction in Domestic Animals, Vol. 47, No. SUPPL. 6, 12.2012, p. 381-386.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Dissen, G, Lomniczi, A, Boudreau, RL, Chen, YH, Davidson, BL & Ojeda, S 2012, 'Applying Gene Silencing Technology to Contraception', Reproduction in Domestic Animals, vol. 47, no. SUPPL. 6, pp. 381-386. https://doi.org/10.1111/rda.12016
    Dissen, Gregory ; Lomniczi, Alejandro ; Boudreau, R. L. ; Chen, Y. H. ; Davidson, B. L. ; Ojeda, Sergio. / Applying Gene Silencing Technology to Contraception. In: Reproduction in Domestic Animals. 2012 ; Vol. 47, No. SUPPL. 6. pp. 381-386.
    @article{cb55ab8b3c0f4d36bd6f6bf0ef9d3dc8,
    title = "Applying Gene Silencing Technology to Contraception",
    abstract = "Contents: Population control of feral animals is often difficult, as it can be dangerous for the animals, labour intensive and expensive. Therefore, a useful tool for control of animal populations would be a non-surgical method to induce sterility. Our laboratories utilize methods aimed at targeting brain cells in vivo with vehicles that deliver a payload of either inhibitory RNAs or genes intended to correct cellular dysfunction. A useful framework for design of a new approach will be the combination of these methods with the intended goal to produce a technique that can be used to non-invasively sterilize cats and dogs. For this approach to succeed, it has to meet several conditions: the target gene must be essential for fertility; the method must include a mechanism to effectively and specifically silence the gene of interest; the method of delivering the silencing agent must be minimally invasive, and finally, the silencing effect must be sustained for the lifespan of the target species, so that expansion of the population can be effectively prevented. In this article, we discuss our work to develop gene silencing technology to induce sterility; we will use examples of our previous studies demonstrating that this approach is viable. These studies include (i) the use of viral vectors able to disrupt reproductive cyclicity when delivered to the regions of the brain involved in the control of reproduction and (ii) experiments with viral vectors that are able to ameliorate neuronal disease when delivered systemically using a novel approach of gene therapy.",
    author = "Gregory Dissen and Alejandro Lomniczi and Boudreau, {R. L.} and Chen, {Y. H.} and Davidson, {B. L.} and Sergio Ojeda",
    year = "2012",
    month = "12",
    doi = "10.1111/rda.12016",
    language = "English (US)",
    volume = "47",
    pages = "381--386",
    journal = "Reproduction in Domestic Animals",
    issn = "0936-6768",
    publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
    number = "SUPPL. 6",

    }

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Applying Gene Silencing Technology to Contraception

    AU - Dissen, Gregory

    AU - Lomniczi, Alejandro

    AU - Boudreau, R. L.

    AU - Chen, Y. H.

    AU - Davidson, B. L.

    AU - Ojeda, Sergio

    PY - 2012/12

    Y1 - 2012/12

    N2 - Contents: Population control of feral animals is often difficult, as it can be dangerous for the animals, labour intensive and expensive. Therefore, a useful tool for control of animal populations would be a non-surgical method to induce sterility. Our laboratories utilize methods aimed at targeting brain cells in vivo with vehicles that deliver a payload of either inhibitory RNAs or genes intended to correct cellular dysfunction. A useful framework for design of a new approach will be the combination of these methods with the intended goal to produce a technique that can be used to non-invasively sterilize cats and dogs. For this approach to succeed, it has to meet several conditions: the target gene must be essential for fertility; the method must include a mechanism to effectively and specifically silence the gene of interest; the method of delivering the silencing agent must be minimally invasive, and finally, the silencing effect must be sustained for the lifespan of the target species, so that expansion of the population can be effectively prevented. In this article, we discuss our work to develop gene silencing technology to induce sterility; we will use examples of our previous studies demonstrating that this approach is viable. These studies include (i) the use of viral vectors able to disrupt reproductive cyclicity when delivered to the regions of the brain involved in the control of reproduction and (ii) experiments with viral vectors that are able to ameliorate neuronal disease when delivered systemically using a novel approach of gene therapy.

    AB - Contents: Population control of feral animals is often difficult, as it can be dangerous for the animals, labour intensive and expensive. Therefore, a useful tool for control of animal populations would be a non-surgical method to induce sterility. Our laboratories utilize methods aimed at targeting brain cells in vivo with vehicles that deliver a payload of either inhibitory RNAs or genes intended to correct cellular dysfunction. A useful framework for design of a new approach will be the combination of these methods with the intended goal to produce a technique that can be used to non-invasively sterilize cats and dogs. For this approach to succeed, it has to meet several conditions: the target gene must be essential for fertility; the method must include a mechanism to effectively and specifically silence the gene of interest; the method of delivering the silencing agent must be minimally invasive, and finally, the silencing effect must be sustained for the lifespan of the target species, so that expansion of the population can be effectively prevented. In this article, we discuss our work to develop gene silencing technology to induce sterility; we will use examples of our previous studies demonstrating that this approach is viable. These studies include (i) the use of viral vectors able to disrupt reproductive cyclicity when delivered to the regions of the brain involved in the control of reproduction and (ii) experiments with viral vectors that are able to ameliorate neuronal disease when delivered systemically using a novel approach of gene therapy.

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84871680964&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84871680964&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    U2 - 10.1111/rda.12016

    DO - 10.1111/rda.12016

    M3 - Article

    VL - 47

    SP - 381

    EP - 386

    JO - Reproduction in Domestic Animals

    JF - Reproduction in Domestic Animals

    SN - 0936-6768

    IS - SUPPL. 6

    ER -