Application of the health belief model: Development of the hearing beliefs questionnaire (HBQ) and its associations with hearing health behaviors

Gabrielle Saunders, Melissa Teahen Frederick, Shienpei Silverman, Melissa Papesh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To develop a hearing beliefs questionnaire (HBQ) that assesses hearing beliefs within the constructs of the health belief model, and to investigate whether HBQ scores are associated with hearing health behaviors. Design: A 60-item version of the questionnaire was developed and completed by 223 participants who also provided information about their hearing health behaviors (help seeking, hearing-aid acquisition, and hearing-aid use). Study sample: Individuals aged between 22 and 90 years recruited from a primary care waiting area at a Veterans hospital. Seventy-six percent were male, 80% were Veterans. Results: A 26-item version of the HBQ with six scales was derived using factor analysis and reliability analyses. The scales measured: perceived susceptibility, perceived severity, perceived benefits, perceived barriers, perceived self-efficacy, and cues to action. HBQ scores differed significantly between individuals with different hearing health behaviors. Logistic regression analyses resulted in robust models of hearing health behaviors that correctly classified between 59% and 100% of participant hearing health behaviors. Conclusions: The HBM appears to be an appropriate framework for examining hearing health behaviors, and the HBQ is a valuable tool for assessing hearing health beliefs and predicting hearing health behaviors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)558-567
Number of pages10
JournalInternational Journal of Audiology
Volume52
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2013

Fingerprint

Health Behavior
development model
health behavior
Hearing
questionnaire
Health
health
Hearing Aids
Surveys and Questionnaires
Questionnaire
self-efficacy
factor analysis
logistics
Veterans Hospitals
faropenem medoxomil
regression
Veterans
Self Efficacy
Statistical Factor Analysis
Cues

Keywords

  • Health behavior
  • Health care seeking behavior
  • Hearing aids
  • Patient acceptance of health care
  • Patient compliance
  • Rehabilitation of hearing impaired

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Speech and Hearing
  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language

Cite this

Application of the health belief model : Development of the hearing beliefs questionnaire (HBQ) and its associations with hearing health behaviors. / Saunders, Gabrielle; Frederick, Melissa Teahen; Silverman, Shienpei; Papesh, Melissa.

In: International Journal of Audiology, Vol. 52, No. 8, 08.2013, p. 558-567.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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