Antiretroviral therapy is associated with increased fertility desire, but not pregnancy or live birth, among HIV+ women in an early HIV treatment program in rural Uganda

Marissa Maier, Irene Andia, Nneka Emenyonu, David Guzman, Angela Kaida, Larry Pepper, Robert Hogg, David R. Bangsberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

96 Scopus citations

Abstract

To assess the association between antiretroviral therapy (ART) and fertility history and desire among HIV-positive Ugandan women, we conducted a cross-sectional study among HIV-positive Ugandan women aged 18-50 years who attended an HIV clinic at Mbarara University in western Uganda between November 1, 2005 and June 6, 2006. Of 538 women approached, 501 were enrolled. ART use was associated with increased odds of fertility desire (AOR 2.99, 95% CI 1.38-6.28), and decreased odds of pregnancy (AOR 0.56, 95% CI 0.33-0.95) and live birth (AOR 0.30, 95% CI 0.13-0.66). ART was associated with an increase in fertility desire, but was not associated with an increase in fertility. Additional studies will be needed to determine if this greater fertility desire among ART-treated women leads to an increase in fertility as ART use expands.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)S28-S37
JournalAIDS and Behavior
Volume13
Issue numberSUPPL. 1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2009

Keywords

  • Antiretroviral therapy
  • Fertility
  • Fertility desires
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Uganda

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

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