Antenatal identification of major depressive disorder: A cohort study

Deirdre J. Lyell, Andrea S. Chambers, Dana Steidtmann, Esther Tsai, Aaron Caughey, Amy Wong, Rachel Manber

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The purpose of this study was to estimate the frequency of identification of major depressive disorder by providers during prenatal care. Study Design: A cohort of pregnant women who were participating in a randomized controlled trial and who had received a diagnosis of major depressive disorder was examined. Women were included in the current study if prenatal clinic records were available and legible. Results: Clinical depression was noted in 56% of prenatal charts and on 24% of problem lists. Physicians and certified nurse midwives noted depression equally (P =.935); physicians more frequently noted mental health referral (23% vs 0%; P =.01), and midwives more frequently included depression on the problem list (P =.01). Recent medication use, which was stopped before conception or study participation, predicted notation of depression in the chart (P =.001). Conclusion: Depression frequently is missed during pregnancy and, when identified, is underacknowledged as a problem. Women who have not recently used antidepressant medication are more likely to be missed. Better screening and acknowledgment are needed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume207
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Major Depressive Disorder
Cohort Studies
Depression
Physicians
Nurse Midwives
Prenatal Care
Midwifery
Antidepressive Agents
Pregnant Women
Mental Health
Referral and Consultation
Randomized Controlled Trials
Pregnancy

Keywords

  • depression
  • major depressive disorder
  • pregnancy
  • prenatal care
  • screening

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Antenatal identification of major depressive disorder : A cohort study. / Lyell, Deirdre J.; Chambers, Andrea S.; Steidtmann, Dana; Tsai, Esther; Caughey, Aaron; Wong, Amy; Manber, Rachel.

In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vol. 207, No. 6, 12.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lyell, Deirdre J. ; Chambers, Andrea S. ; Steidtmann, Dana ; Tsai, Esther ; Caughey, Aaron ; Wong, Amy ; Manber, Rachel. / Antenatal identification of major depressive disorder : A cohort study. In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 2012 ; Vol. 207, No. 6.
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