Animal models of anxiety and stress- induced behavior

Effects of neuroactive steroids

Deborah (Deb) Finn, Robert H. Purdy, George F. Koob

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Behaviorally, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-agonist neuroactive steroids now are recognized to possess especially potent anesthetic, hypnotic, anxiolytic, and anticonvulsant properties. It has been over 60 years since Hans Selye (1942)1 reported the sedative-anesthetic activity of the hormones progesterone and deoxycorticosterone, where of 75 steroids tested by i.p. administration in rodents, 5β-pregnanedione was the most active. This led to the introduction of hydroxydione sodium (21-hydroxy-5β-pregnane-3,20-dione sodium succinate) as the first steroidal anesthetic in 1955.2 However, it was Margarethe Holzbauer and her colleagues, from 1969 to 1985, who isolated and identified pregnenolone, progesterone, allopregnanolone (3α,5α-THP), epiallopregnanolone (3β,5α- THP), allopregnanedione (5α-DHP), 20α-dihydroprogesterone, and allopregnanediol (5α-pregnane-3α,20α-diol) from ovarian venous blood of the rat, and measured the ovarian content and secretion rates of these steroids during proestrus (reviewed in Holzbauer3). Their work was seminal, but often is forgotten. Holzbauer and colleagues4 further demonstrated the in vivo secretion of pregnenolone, progesterone, and 3α,5α-THP by the adrenal gland of the rat in quantities similar to those secreted by the ovary in estrus.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationNeurosteroid Effects in the Central Nervous System
Subtitle of host publicationThe Role of the GABA-A Receptor
PublisherCRC Press
Pages317-338
Number of pages22
ISBN (Electronic)9780203508169
ISBN (Print)0849323924, 9780849323928
StatePublished - Jan 1 2003

Fingerprint

Progesterone
Pregnanes
Anesthetics
Pregnenolone
Anxiety
Animal Models
Steroids
Hypnotics and Sedatives
Pregnanediones
20-alpha-Dihydroprogesterone
Pregnanolone
GABA Agonists
Aminobutyrates
Proestrus
Desoxycorticosterone
Anti-Anxiety Agents
Estrus
Succinic Acid
Adrenal Glands
Anticonvulsants

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Medicine(all)
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)

Cite this

Finn, D. D., Purdy, R. H., & Koob, G. F. (2003). Animal models of anxiety and stress- induced behavior: Effects of neuroactive steroids. In Neurosteroid Effects in the Central Nervous System: The Role of the GABA-A Receptor (pp. 317-338). CRC Press.

Animal models of anxiety and stress- induced behavior : Effects of neuroactive steroids. / Finn, Deborah (Deb); Purdy, Robert H.; Koob, George F.

Neurosteroid Effects in the Central Nervous System: The Role of the GABA-A Receptor. CRC Press, 2003. p. 317-338.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Finn, DD, Purdy, RH & Koob, GF 2003, Animal models of anxiety and stress- induced behavior: Effects of neuroactive steroids. in Neurosteroid Effects in the Central Nervous System: The Role of the GABA-A Receptor. CRC Press, pp. 317-338.
Finn DD, Purdy RH, Koob GF. Animal models of anxiety and stress- induced behavior: Effects of neuroactive steroids. In Neurosteroid Effects in the Central Nervous System: The Role of the GABA-A Receptor. CRC Press. 2003. p. 317-338
Finn, Deborah (Deb) ; Purdy, Robert H. ; Koob, George F. / Animal models of anxiety and stress- induced behavior : Effects of neuroactive steroids. Neurosteroid Effects in the Central Nervous System: The Role of the GABA-A Receptor. CRC Press, 2003. pp. 317-338
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