Androgen supplementation improves some but not all aspects of immune senescence in aged male macaques

Maham Rais, Randall M. Wilson, Henryk Urbanski, Ilhem Messaoudi

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    9 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Aging leads to a progressive decline in immune function commonly referred to as immune senescence, which results in increased incidence and severity of infection. In addition, older males experience a significant disruption in their levels of circulating androgens, notably testosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), which has been linked to sarcopenia, osteoporosis, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes. Since sex steroid levels modulate immune function, it is possible that the age-related decline in androgen levels can also affect immune senescence. Therefore, in this study, we evaluated the pleiotropic effects of physiological androgen supplementation in aged male rhesus macaques (n = 7/group) on immune cell subset frequency and response to vaccination. As expected, frequency of naïve CD4 and CD8 T cells declined in aged non-treated macaques, while that of memory T cells increased. In contrast, frequency of naïve and memory T cells remained stable in androgen-supplemented males. In addition, levels of inflammatory cytokines increased less steeply in supplemented aged males compared to the aged controls. Despite these changes, androgen-supplemented animals only showed modest improvement in antibody responses following vaccination compared to age non-treated controls. These data indicate that short-term physiological androgen supplementation can improve some but not all aspects of immune senescence.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)1-12
    Number of pages12
    JournalGeroScience
    DOIs
    StateAccepted/In press - Jun 14 2017

    Fingerprint

    Macaca
    Androgens
    T-Lymphocytes
    Vaccination
    Sarcopenia
    Dehydroepiandrosterone
    Macaca mulatta
    Osteoporosis
    Antibody Formation
    Testosterone
    Cardiovascular Diseases
    Steroids
    Cytokines
    Incidence
    Infection

    Keywords

    • Androgens
    • Andropause
    • Immune senescence
    • Inflammation
    • Rhesus macaques
    • T cells

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Aging
    • Geriatrics and Gerontology

    Cite this

    Androgen supplementation improves some but not all aspects of immune senescence in aged male macaques. / Rais, Maham; Wilson, Randall M.; Urbanski, Henryk; Messaoudi, Ilhem.

    In: GeroScience, 14.06.2017, p. 1-12.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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