Analyzing 180 degrees turns using an inertial system reveals early signs of progression of Parkinson's disease.

Arash Salarian, Cris Zampieri, Fay Horak, Patricia Carlson-Kuhta, John Nutt, Kamiar Aminian

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67 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Changes in turning are one of the early motor deficiencies in Parkinson's Disease (PD). We have proposed a system based on wearable, inertial sensors and a novel automatic analysis algorithm that can assess 180 degrees turns. Twelve patients in early stages of PD and 14 age-matched healthy subjects were enrolled in this study. Inertial sensors were attached on shanks and sternum. Measurement protocol included walking on a straight pathway, turning 180 degrees and returning back. Subjects were measured 4 times, once every 6 months during an 18 months period. At the baseline, 9 subjects from each group repeated the test twice to assess test-retest reliability. Patients with mild PD had a very low Postural Instability Gait Difficulty (PIGD subscore of UPDRS III) score (average 0.67, min 0, max 3). The analysis showed that the patients had a significantly longer turning duration (2.18+/-0.43 vs. 1.79+/-0.27 seconds, p0.85). Turning duration also showed a significant Group *Time interaction (p

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Parkinson Disease
Sternum
Gait
Reproducibility of Results
Walking
Healthy Volunteers
Sensors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
  • Signal Processing
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Health Informatics

Cite this

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title = "Analyzing 180 degrees turns using an inertial system reveals early signs of progression of Parkinson's disease.",
abstract = "Changes in turning are one of the early motor deficiencies in Parkinson's Disease (PD). We have proposed a system based on wearable, inertial sensors and a novel automatic analysis algorithm that can assess 180 degrees turns. Twelve patients in early stages of PD and 14 age-matched healthy subjects were enrolled in this study. Inertial sensors were attached on shanks and sternum. Measurement protocol included walking on a straight pathway, turning 180 degrees and returning back. Subjects were measured 4 times, once every 6 months during an 18 months period. At the baseline, 9 subjects from each group repeated the test twice to assess test-retest reliability. Patients with mild PD had a very low Postural Instability Gait Difficulty (PIGD subscore of UPDRS III) score (average 0.67, min 0, max 3). The analysis showed that the patients had a significantly longer turning duration (2.18+/-0.43 vs. 1.79+/-0.27 seconds, p0.85). Turning duration also showed a significant Group *Time interaction (p",
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AU - Salarian, Arash

AU - Zampieri, Cris

AU - Horak, Fay

AU - Carlson-Kuhta, Patricia

AU - Nutt, John

AU - Aminian, Kamiar

PY - 2009

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