Analysis of electromyographic signals in human jaw closing muscles at various isometric force levels

G. T. Clark, M. C. Carter, Phyllis Beemsterboer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The effect of sustained isometric contraction on surface electromyograph (EMG) and force signals derived from these muscles was examined. Premolar-molar region force was measured with a small unilaterally positioned force transducer. Subjects produced and sustained 25, 50, 75 and 100 per cent isometric force levels, and measurements were made at the beginning and end of these efforts. There was no significant change in the resulting EMG/force ratio at any of the force levels. The EMG signal did exhibit a significant shift in its frequency both as the force level increased and during the sustained effort. Neuromuscular fatigue, when defined as a change in the EMG/force ratio, was not demonstrated even though there was a consistent change in the frequency of the EMG signal.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)833-837
Number of pages5
JournalArchives of Oral Biology
Volume33
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - 1988
Externally publishedYes

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Isometric Contraction
Bicuspid
Jaw
Transducers
Fatigue
Muscles

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

Analysis of electromyographic signals in human jaw closing muscles at various isometric force levels. / Clark, G. T.; Carter, M. C.; Beemsterboer, Phyllis.

In: Archives of Oral Biology, Vol. 33, No. 11, 1988, p. 833-837.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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