Analysis of complications from abdominoplasty

A review of 206 cases at a university hospital

Keith C. Neaman, Juliana Hansen

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    132 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The number of abdominoplasties performed in the United States has been steadily increasing over the past decade. A large proportion of these patients are bariatric patients who remain obese despite prior weight-reduction surgery. This study was done to review the experience of patients undergoing abdominoplasty at a university hospital. A retrospective chart review of 206 consecutive patients was performed. The overall complication rate was 37.4%. Major complications [hematoma requiring surgical intervention, seroma requiring aspiration or surgical drainage, cellulitis or abscess requiring hospitalization and intravenous (IV) antibiotics, deep vein thrombosis (DVT), and pulmonary embolism (PE)] occurred in 16% of patients. The rate of minor complications (hematoma or seroma requiring no intervention, epidermolysis, small-wound dehiscence, neuropathic pain, and minor cellulitis) was 26.7%. Obese patients had a significantly increased risk of developing major complications as compared with nonobese patients (53.4% versus 28.8%, P = 0.001). An in-depth analysis of all complications and risk factors was done.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)292-298
    Number of pages7
    JournalAnnals of Plastic Surgery
    Volume58
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Mar 2007

    Fingerprint

    Abdominoplasty
    Seroma
    Cellulitis
    Hematoma
    Bariatrics
    Neuralgia
    Pulmonary Embolism
    Venous Thrombosis
    Abscess
    Weight Loss
    Drainage
    Hospitalization
    Anti-Bacterial Agents
    Wounds and Injuries

    Keywords

    • Abdominoplasty
    • Bariatric surgery
    • Body contouring
    • Seroma

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Surgery

    Cite this

    Analysis of complications from abdominoplasty : A review of 206 cases at a university hospital. / Neaman, Keith C.; Hansen, Juliana.

    In: Annals of Plastic Surgery, Vol. 58, No. 3, 03.2007, p. 292-298.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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