Anaesthetic neurotoxicity and neuroplasticity

An expert group report and statement based on the BJA Salzburg Seminar

V. Jevtovic-Todorovic, A. R. Absalom, K. Blomgren, Ansgar Brambrink, G. Crosby, D. J. Culley, G. Fiskum, R. G. Giffard, K. F. Herold, A. W. Loepke, D. Ma, B. A. Orser, E. Planel, W. Slikker, S. G. Soriano, G. Stratmann, L. Vutskits, Z. Xie, H. C. Hemmings

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

144 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although previously considered entirely reversible, general anaesthesia is now being viewed as a potentially significant risk to cognitive performance at both extremes of age. A large body of preclinical as well as some retrospective clinical evidence suggest that exposure to general anaesthesia could be detrimental to cognitive development in young subjects, and might also contribute to accelerated cognitive decline in the elderly. A group of experts in anaesthetic neuropharmacology and neurotoxicity convened in Salzburg, Austria for the BJA Salzburg Seminar on Anaesthetic Neurotoxicity and Neuroplasticity. This focused workshop was sponsored by the British Journal of Anaesthesia to review and critically assess currently available evidence from animal and human studies, and to consider the direction of future research. It was concluded that mounting evidence from preclinical studies reveals general anaesthetics to be powerful modulators of neuronal development and function, which could contribute to detrimental behavioural outcomes. However, definitive clinical data remain elusive. Since general anaesthesia often cannot be avoided regardless of patient age, it is important to understand the complex mechanisms and effects involved in anaesthesia-induced neurotoxicity, and to develop strategies for avoiding or limiting potential brain injury through evidence-based approaches.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)143-151
Number of pages9
JournalBritish Journal of Anaesthesia
Volume111
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2013

Fingerprint

Neuronal Plasticity
General Anesthesia
Anesthetics
Anesthesia
Neuropharmacology
General Anesthetics
Austria
Brain Injuries
Education

Keywords

  • anaesthesia, general
  • anaesthetics
  • cognitive disorder
  • neurotoxicity syndromes
  • postoperative complications

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Cite this

Jevtovic-Todorovic, V., Absalom, A. R., Blomgren, K., Brambrink, A., Crosby, G., Culley, D. J., ... Hemmings, H. C. (2013). Anaesthetic neurotoxicity and neuroplasticity: An expert group report and statement based on the BJA Salzburg Seminar. British Journal of Anaesthesia, 111(2), 143-151. https://doi.org/10.1093/bja/aet177

Anaesthetic neurotoxicity and neuroplasticity : An expert group report and statement based on the BJA Salzburg Seminar. / Jevtovic-Todorovic, V.; Absalom, A. R.; Blomgren, K.; Brambrink, Ansgar; Crosby, G.; Culley, D. J.; Fiskum, G.; Giffard, R. G.; Herold, K. F.; Loepke, A. W.; Ma, D.; Orser, B. A.; Planel, E.; Slikker, W.; Soriano, S. G.; Stratmann, G.; Vutskits, L.; Xie, Z.; Hemmings, H. C.

In: British Journal of Anaesthesia, Vol. 111, No. 2, 08.2013, p. 143-151.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jevtovic-Todorovic, V, Absalom, AR, Blomgren, K, Brambrink, A, Crosby, G, Culley, DJ, Fiskum, G, Giffard, RG, Herold, KF, Loepke, AW, Ma, D, Orser, BA, Planel, E, Slikker, W, Soriano, SG, Stratmann, G, Vutskits, L, Xie, Z & Hemmings, HC 2013, 'Anaesthetic neurotoxicity and neuroplasticity: An expert group report and statement based on the BJA Salzburg Seminar', British Journal of Anaesthesia, vol. 111, no. 2, pp. 143-151. https://doi.org/10.1093/bja/aet177
Jevtovic-Todorovic, V. ; Absalom, A. R. ; Blomgren, K. ; Brambrink, Ansgar ; Crosby, G. ; Culley, D. J. ; Fiskum, G. ; Giffard, R. G. ; Herold, K. F. ; Loepke, A. W. ; Ma, D. ; Orser, B. A. ; Planel, E. ; Slikker, W. ; Soriano, S. G. ; Stratmann, G. ; Vutskits, L. ; Xie, Z. ; Hemmings, H. C. / Anaesthetic neurotoxicity and neuroplasticity : An expert group report and statement based on the BJA Salzburg Seminar. In: British Journal of Anaesthesia. 2013 ; Vol. 111, No. 2. pp. 143-151.
@article{3eaeb50b39bb476387a84916cf79c488,
title = "Anaesthetic neurotoxicity and neuroplasticity: An expert group report and statement based on the BJA Salzburg Seminar",
abstract = "Although previously considered entirely reversible, general anaesthesia is now being viewed as a potentially significant risk to cognitive performance at both extremes of age. A large body of preclinical as well as some retrospective clinical evidence suggest that exposure to general anaesthesia could be detrimental to cognitive development in young subjects, and might also contribute to accelerated cognitive decline in the elderly. A group of experts in anaesthetic neuropharmacology and neurotoxicity convened in Salzburg, Austria for the BJA Salzburg Seminar on Anaesthetic Neurotoxicity and Neuroplasticity. This focused workshop was sponsored by the British Journal of Anaesthesia to review and critically assess currently available evidence from animal and human studies, and to consider the direction of future research. It was concluded that mounting evidence from preclinical studies reveals general anaesthetics to be powerful modulators of neuronal development and function, which could contribute to detrimental behavioural outcomes. However, definitive clinical data remain elusive. Since general anaesthesia often cannot be avoided regardless of patient age, it is important to understand the complex mechanisms and effects involved in anaesthesia-induced neurotoxicity, and to develop strategies for avoiding or limiting potential brain injury through evidence-based approaches.",
keywords = "anaesthesia, general, anaesthetics, cognitive disorder, neurotoxicity syndromes, postoperative complications",
author = "V. Jevtovic-Todorovic and Absalom, {A. R.} and K. Blomgren and Ansgar Brambrink and G. Crosby and Culley, {D. J.} and G. Fiskum and Giffard, {R. G.} and Herold, {K. F.} and Loepke, {A. W.} and D. Ma and Orser, {B. A.} and E. Planel and W. Slikker and Soriano, {S. G.} and G. Stratmann and L. Vutskits and Z. Xie and Hemmings, {H. C.}",
year = "2013",
month = "8",
doi = "10.1093/bja/aet177",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "111",
pages = "143--151",
journal = "British Journal of Anaesthesia",
issn = "0007-0912",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Anaesthetic neurotoxicity and neuroplasticity

T2 - An expert group report and statement based on the BJA Salzburg Seminar

AU - Jevtovic-Todorovic, V.

AU - Absalom, A. R.

AU - Blomgren, K.

AU - Brambrink, Ansgar

AU - Crosby, G.

AU - Culley, D. J.

AU - Fiskum, G.

AU - Giffard, R. G.

AU - Herold, K. F.

AU - Loepke, A. W.

AU - Ma, D.

AU - Orser, B. A.

AU - Planel, E.

AU - Slikker, W.

AU - Soriano, S. G.

AU - Stratmann, G.

AU - Vutskits, L.

AU - Xie, Z.

AU - Hemmings, H. C.

PY - 2013/8

Y1 - 2013/8

N2 - Although previously considered entirely reversible, general anaesthesia is now being viewed as a potentially significant risk to cognitive performance at both extremes of age. A large body of preclinical as well as some retrospective clinical evidence suggest that exposure to general anaesthesia could be detrimental to cognitive development in young subjects, and might also contribute to accelerated cognitive decline in the elderly. A group of experts in anaesthetic neuropharmacology and neurotoxicity convened in Salzburg, Austria for the BJA Salzburg Seminar on Anaesthetic Neurotoxicity and Neuroplasticity. This focused workshop was sponsored by the British Journal of Anaesthesia to review and critically assess currently available evidence from animal and human studies, and to consider the direction of future research. It was concluded that mounting evidence from preclinical studies reveals general anaesthetics to be powerful modulators of neuronal development and function, which could contribute to detrimental behavioural outcomes. However, definitive clinical data remain elusive. Since general anaesthesia often cannot be avoided regardless of patient age, it is important to understand the complex mechanisms and effects involved in anaesthesia-induced neurotoxicity, and to develop strategies for avoiding or limiting potential brain injury through evidence-based approaches.

AB - Although previously considered entirely reversible, general anaesthesia is now being viewed as a potentially significant risk to cognitive performance at both extremes of age. A large body of preclinical as well as some retrospective clinical evidence suggest that exposure to general anaesthesia could be detrimental to cognitive development in young subjects, and might also contribute to accelerated cognitive decline in the elderly. A group of experts in anaesthetic neuropharmacology and neurotoxicity convened in Salzburg, Austria for the BJA Salzburg Seminar on Anaesthetic Neurotoxicity and Neuroplasticity. This focused workshop was sponsored by the British Journal of Anaesthesia to review and critically assess currently available evidence from animal and human studies, and to consider the direction of future research. It was concluded that mounting evidence from preclinical studies reveals general anaesthetics to be powerful modulators of neuronal development and function, which could contribute to detrimental behavioural outcomes. However, definitive clinical data remain elusive. Since general anaesthesia often cannot be avoided regardless of patient age, it is important to understand the complex mechanisms and effects involved in anaesthesia-induced neurotoxicity, and to develop strategies for avoiding or limiting potential brain injury through evidence-based approaches.

KW - anaesthesia, general

KW - anaesthetics

KW - cognitive disorder

KW - neurotoxicity syndromes

KW - postoperative complications

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84878601588&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84878601588&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1093/bja/aet177

DO - 10.1093/bja/aet177

M3 - Article

VL - 111

SP - 143

EP - 151

JO - British Journal of Anaesthesia

JF - British Journal of Anaesthesia

SN - 0007-0912

IS - 2

ER -