An official American thoracic society/european respiratory society workshop report: Evaluation of respiratory mechanics and function in the pediatric and neonatal intensive care units

Stacey Peterson-Carmichael, Paul C. Seddon, Ira M. Cheifetz, Inez Frerichs, Graham L. Hall, Jurg Hammer, Zoltan Hantos, Anton H. Van Kaam, Cynthia (Cindy) McEvoy, Christopher J L Newth, J. Jane Pillow, Gerrard F. Rafferty, Margaret Rosenfeld, Janet Stocks, Sarath C. Ranganathan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Ready access to physiologic measures, including respiratory mechanics, lung volumes, and ventilation/perfusion inhomogeneity, could optimize the clinical management of the critically ill pediatric or neonatal patient and minimize lung injury. There are many techniques for measuring respiratory function in infants and children but very limited information on the technical ease and applicability of these tests in the pediatric and neonatal intensive care unit (PICU, NICU) environments. This report summarizes the proceedings of a 2011 American Thoracic Society Workshop critically reviewing techniques available for ventilated and spontaneously breathing infants and children in the ICU. It outlines for each test how readily it is performed at the bedside and how it may impact patientmanagement aswell as indicating future areas of potential research collaboration. From expert panel discussions and literature reviews, we conclude thatmany of the techniques can aid in optimizing respiratory support in the PICU and NICU, quantifying the effect of therapeutic interventions, and guiding ventilator weaning and extubation. Most techniques now have commercially available equipment for the PICU andNICU, and many can generate continuous data points to help with ventilator weaning and other interventions. Technical and validation studies in the PICU and NICU are published for the majority of techniques; some have been used as outcome measures in clinical trials, but few have been assessed specifically for their ability to improve clinical outcomes. Although they show considerable promise, these techniques still require further study in the PICU and NICU together with increased availability of commercial equipment before wider incorporation into daily clinical practice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)S1-S11
JournalAnnals of the American Thoracic Society
Volume13
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2016

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

Peterson-Carmichael, S., Seddon, P. C., Cheifetz, I. M., Frerichs, I., Hall, G. L., Hammer, J., Hantos, Z., Van Kaam, A. H., McEvoy, C. C., Newth, C. J. L., Pillow, J. J., Rafferty, G. F., Rosenfeld, M., Stocks, J., & Ranganathan, S. C. (2016). An official American thoracic society/european respiratory society workshop report: Evaluation of respiratory mechanics and function in the pediatric and neonatal intensive care units. Annals of the American Thoracic Society, 13(2), S1-S11. https://doi.org/10.1513/AnnalsATS.201511-730ST