An observer model for quantifying panning artifacts in digital pathology

Ali R.N. Avanaki, Kathryn S. Espig, Albert Xthona, Christian Lanciault, Tom R.L. Kimpe

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Typically, pathologists pan from one region of a slide to another, choosing areas of interest for closer inspection. Due to finite frame rate and imperfect zero-order hold reconstruction (i.e., the non-zero time to reach the target brightness after a change in pixel drive), panning in whole slide images (WSI) cause visual artifacts. It is important to study the impact of such artifacts since research suggests that 49% of navigation is conducted in low-power/overview with digital pathology (Molin et al., Histopathology 2015). In this paper, we explain what types of medical information may be harmed by panning artifacts, propose a method to simulate panning artifacts, and design an observer model to predict the impact of panning artifacts on typical human observers' performance in basic diagnostically relevant visual tasks. The proposed observer model is based on derivation of perceived object border maps from luminance and chrominance information and may be tuned to account for visual acuity of the human observer to be modeled. Our results suggest that increasing the contrast (e.g., using a wide gamut display) with a slow response panel may not mitigate the panning artifacts which mostly affect visual tasks involving spatial discrimination of objects (e.g., normal vs abnormal structure, cell type and spatial relationships between them, and low-power nuclear morphology), and that the panning artifacts worsen with increasing panning speed. The proposed methods may be used as building blocks in an automatic WSI quality assessment framework.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationMedical Imaging 2017
Subtitle of host publicationImage Perception, Observer Performance, and Technology Assessment
EditorsRobert M. Nishikawa, Matthew A. Kupinski
PublisherSPIE
ISBN (Electronic)9781510607170
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017
EventMedical Imaging 2017: Image Perception, Observer Performance, and Technology Assessment - Orlando, United States
Duration: Feb 12 2017Feb 13 2017

Publication series

NameProgress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE
Volume10136
ISSN (Print)1605-7422

Conference

ConferenceMedical Imaging 2017: Image Perception, Observer Performance, and Technology Assessment
CountryUnited States
CityOrlando
Period2/12/172/13/17

Fingerprint

pathology
Pathology
Artifacts
artifacts
Luminance
Nuclear energy
Image quality
visual tasks
chutes
Navigation
Inspection
Pixels
Display devices
visual acuity
luminance
navigation
borders
Visual Acuity
discrimination
inspection

Keywords

  • Anthropomorphic numerical observer
  • Human visual system properties

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Biomaterials
  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Avanaki, A. R. N., Espig, K. S., Xthona, A., Lanciault, C., & Kimpe, T. R. L. (2017). An observer model for quantifying panning artifacts in digital pathology. In R. M. Nishikawa, & M. A. Kupinski (Eds.), Medical Imaging 2017: Image Perception, Observer Performance, and Technology Assessment [101360O] (Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE; Vol. 10136). SPIE. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2255533

An observer model for quantifying panning artifacts in digital pathology. / Avanaki, Ali R.N.; Espig, Kathryn S.; Xthona, Albert; Lanciault, Christian; Kimpe, Tom R.L.

Medical Imaging 2017: Image Perception, Observer Performance, and Technology Assessment. ed. / Robert M. Nishikawa; Matthew A. Kupinski. SPIE, 2017. 101360O (Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE; Vol. 10136).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Avanaki, ARN, Espig, KS, Xthona, A, Lanciault, C & Kimpe, TRL 2017, An observer model for quantifying panning artifacts in digital pathology. in RM Nishikawa & MA Kupinski (eds), Medical Imaging 2017: Image Perception, Observer Performance, and Technology Assessment., 101360O, Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE, vol. 10136, SPIE, Medical Imaging 2017: Image Perception, Observer Performance, and Technology Assessment, Orlando, United States, 2/12/17. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2255533
Avanaki ARN, Espig KS, Xthona A, Lanciault C, Kimpe TRL. An observer model for quantifying panning artifacts in digital pathology. In Nishikawa RM, Kupinski MA, editors, Medical Imaging 2017: Image Perception, Observer Performance, and Technology Assessment. SPIE. 2017. 101360O. (Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE). https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2255533
Avanaki, Ali R.N. ; Espig, Kathryn S. ; Xthona, Albert ; Lanciault, Christian ; Kimpe, Tom R.L. / An observer model for quantifying panning artifacts in digital pathology. Medical Imaging 2017: Image Perception, Observer Performance, and Technology Assessment. editor / Robert M. Nishikawa ; Matthew A. Kupinski. SPIE, 2017. (Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE).
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