An exploration of management practices in hospitals

Kenneth (John) McConnell, Anna Marie Chang, Thomas M. Maddox, Douglas R. Wholey, Richard C. Lindrooth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Management practices, including, for example, "Lean" methodologies originally developed at Toyota, may represent one mechanism for improving healthcare performance. Methods: We surveyed 597 nurse managers at cardiac units to score management on the basis of poor, average, or high performance on 18 practices across 4 dimensions (Lean operations, performance measurement, targets, and employee incentives). We assessed the relationship of management scores to hospital characteristics (size, non-profit status) and market level variables. Results: Our findings provide concrete examples of the high degree of management proficiency of some hospitals, as well as wide variation in management practices. Although the exact ways in which these tools have been implemented vary across hospitals, we identified multiple examples of units that use standardization in their care, track performance on a frequent basis and display data in a visual manner, and set aggressive goals and communicate them clearly to their staff. Regression models indicate that higher management scores are associated with hospitals in more competitive markets, teaching hospitals, and hospitals with a higher net income from patient services (p

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)121-129
Number of pages9
JournalHealthcare
Volume2
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

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Practice Management
Health Facility Size
Data Display
Nurse Administrators
Teaching Hospitals
Motivation
Delivery of Health Care

Keywords

  • Cardiac units
  • Hospitals
  • Lean
  • Management
  • Quality improvement

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy

Cite this

McConnell, K. J., Chang, A. M., Maddox, T. M., Wholey, D. R., & Lindrooth, R. C. (2014). An exploration of management practices in hospitals. Healthcare, 2(2), 121-129. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.hjdsi.2013.12.014

An exploration of management practices in hospitals. / McConnell, Kenneth (John); Chang, Anna Marie; Maddox, Thomas M.; Wholey, Douglas R.; Lindrooth, Richard C.

In: Healthcare, Vol. 2, No. 2, 2014, p. 121-129.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

McConnell, KJ, Chang, AM, Maddox, TM, Wholey, DR & Lindrooth, RC 2014, 'An exploration of management practices in hospitals', Healthcare, vol. 2, no. 2, pp. 121-129. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.hjdsi.2013.12.014
McConnell, Kenneth (John) ; Chang, Anna Marie ; Maddox, Thomas M. ; Wholey, Douglas R. ; Lindrooth, Richard C. / An exploration of management practices in hospitals. In: Healthcare. 2014 ; Vol. 2, No. 2. pp. 121-129.
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