An economic evaluation of a laboratory monitoring program for renin-angiotensin system agents

David H. Smith, Marsha A. Raebel, K. Arnold Chan, Eric S. Johnson, Amanda F. Petrik, Jessica Weiss, Xiuhai Yang, Adrianne Feldstein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. The efficiency of patient safety interventions is not well studied, especially laboratory monitoring for drug therapy. More than one-third of preventable adverse drug events are associated with inadequate monitoring. Current knowledge of decreasing adverse drug events through expanded monitoring programs is lacking. Design. The authors focused on a laboratory monitoring program (above usual practice) of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) agents to prevent adverse events of hyperkalemia and acute renal failure. They used a probabilistic decision model to estimate cost savings and cost effectiveness (at $30,000 and $10,000 per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY)). Costs included the monitoring program, and offsets from reduced care in 3 populations (overall, chronic kidney disease [CKD], and diabetes). Main results. Adverse events were most common in those with CKD. Intervening on all new users or the subset with diabetes was almost never expected to be cost saving (probability

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)315-324
Number of pages10
JournalMedical Decision Making
Volume31
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2011

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Renin-Angiotensin System
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions
Chronic Renal Insufficiency
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Costs and Cost Analysis
Hyperkalemia
Quality-Adjusted Life Years
Cost Savings
Statistical Models
Patient Safety
Acute Kidney Injury
Drug Therapy
Population

Keywords

  • Comparative effectiveness
  • Cost-effectiveness analysis
  • Evidence synthesis
  • Health economics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Smith, D. H., Raebel, M. A., Chan, K. A., Johnson, E. S., Petrik, A. F., Weiss, J., ... Feldstein, A. (2011). An economic evaluation of a laboratory monitoring program for renin-angiotensin system agents. Medical Decision Making, 31(2), 315-324. https://doi.org/10.1177/0272989X10379918

An economic evaluation of a laboratory monitoring program for renin-angiotensin system agents. / Smith, David H.; Raebel, Marsha A.; Chan, K. Arnold; Johnson, Eric S.; Petrik, Amanda F.; Weiss, Jessica; Yang, Xiuhai; Feldstein, Adrianne.

In: Medical Decision Making, Vol. 31, No. 2, 03.2011, p. 315-324.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Smith, DH, Raebel, MA, Chan, KA, Johnson, ES, Petrik, AF, Weiss, J, Yang, X & Feldstein, A 2011, 'An economic evaluation of a laboratory monitoring program for renin-angiotensin system agents', Medical Decision Making, vol. 31, no. 2, pp. 315-324. https://doi.org/10.1177/0272989X10379918
Smith, David H. ; Raebel, Marsha A. ; Chan, K. Arnold ; Johnson, Eric S. ; Petrik, Amanda F. ; Weiss, Jessica ; Yang, Xiuhai ; Feldstein, Adrianne. / An economic evaluation of a laboratory monitoring program for renin-angiotensin system agents. In: Medical Decision Making. 2011 ; Vol. 31, No. 2. pp. 315-324.
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