An Automated Method for Neuronal Spike Source Identification

Roberto A. Santiago, James McNames, Kim Burchiel, George G. Lendaris

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Analysis of microelectrode recordings (MER) of extracellular neuronal activity has gained increasing interest due to potential improvements to surgical techniques involving ablation or placement of deep brain stimulators, as is common in the treatment of Parkinson's disease. Critical to these procedures is the identification of different brain structures such as the globus pallidus internus (GPI). Evidence suggests that the spike trains from individual neurons contain enough information to identify the brain structure in which they are located. For the work reported here, spike train data gathered during surgical procedure from multiple patients is used. Using a moving window sampling approach, a novel feature extraction method for spike trains was developed. This method is then used in combination with a support vector classification algorithm. Results strongly indicate that the sampling methods reported here are able to extract the necessary information for highly accurate spike source identification.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the International Joint Conference on Neural Networks
Pages2837-2842
Number of pages6
Volume4
StatePublished - 2003
EventInternational Joint Conference on Neural Networks 2003 - Portland, OR, United States
Duration: Jul 20 2003Jul 24 2003

Other

OtherInternational Joint Conference on Neural Networks 2003
CountryUnited States
CityPortland, OR
Period7/20/037/24/03

Fingerprint

Brain
Sampling
Microelectrodes
Ablation
Neurons
Feature extraction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Software

Cite this

Santiago, R. A., McNames, J., Burchiel, K., & Lendaris, G. G. (2003). An Automated Method for Neuronal Spike Source Identification. In Proceedings of the International Joint Conference on Neural Networks (Vol. 4, pp. 2837-2842)

An Automated Method for Neuronal Spike Source Identification. / Santiago, Roberto A.; McNames, James; Burchiel, Kim; Lendaris, George G.

Proceedings of the International Joint Conference on Neural Networks. Vol. 4 2003. p. 2837-2842.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Santiago, RA, McNames, J, Burchiel, K & Lendaris, GG 2003, An Automated Method for Neuronal Spike Source Identification. in Proceedings of the International Joint Conference on Neural Networks. vol. 4, pp. 2837-2842, International Joint Conference on Neural Networks 2003, Portland, OR, United States, 7/20/03.
Santiago RA, McNames J, Burchiel K, Lendaris GG. An Automated Method for Neuronal Spike Source Identification. In Proceedings of the International Joint Conference on Neural Networks. Vol. 4. 2003. p. 2837-2842
Santiago, Roberto A. ; McNames, James ; Burchiel, Kim ; Lendaris, George G. / An Automated Method for Neuronal Spike Source Identification. Proceedings of the International Joint Conference on Neural Networks. Vol. 4 2003. pp. 2837-2842
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