American Muslim women's experiences of leaving abusive relationships

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    34 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    American Muslim women are a growing population whose experiences of abuse remain largely unstudied. To begin to amend this gap in knowledge, this article examines American Muslim women's experiences of leaving abusive partners as reported in a larger narrative study. The process of leaving as described by participants includes four stages: reaching the point of saturation, getting khula (an Islamic divorce initiated by wives), facing family and/or community disapproval, and reclaiming the self. Each of these stages illustrates the significance of group-oriented cultural values in shaping participants' experiences of leaving their abusers. I compare study findings with existing literature and conclude by offering suggestions for research and practice in this area.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)415-432
    Number of pages18
    JournalHealth Care for Woman International
    Volume22
    Issue number4
    StatePublished - Jun 2001

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    Islam
    Divorce
    Spouses
    Research
    Population

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Health Professions(all)

    Cite this

    American Muslim women's experiences of leaving abusive relationships. / Hassouneh, Dena.

    In: Health Care for Woman International, Vol. 22, No. 4, 06.2001, p. 415-432.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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