American Indians with substance use disorders

Treatment needs and comorbid conditions

Traci Rieckmann, Dennis McCarty, Anne Kovas, Paul Spicer, Joe Bray, Steve Gilbert, Jacqueline Mercer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/ANs) experience significant disparities in health status and access to care. Furthermore, only limited data are available on substance use, mental health disorders, and treatment needs for this population. Addressing such disparities and developing culturally relevant, effective interventions for AI/AN communities require participatory research. Objectives and Methods: The Western States Node of the National Institute on Drug Abuse Clinical Trials Network partnered with two American Indian substance abuse treatment programs: an urban health center and a reservation-based program to assess client characteristics, drug use patterns, and treatment needs. Data collected by staff members at the respective programs from urban (n 74) and reservation (n 121) clients were compared. Additional sub-analysis examined patients reporting regular opioid use and mood disorders. Results: Findings indicate that urban clients were more likely to report employment problems, polysubstance use, and a history of abuse. Reservation-based clients reported having more severe medical problems and a greater prevalence of psychiatric problems. Clients who were regular opioid users were more likely to report having a chronic medical condition, suicidal thoughts, suicide attempts, polysubstance abuse, and IV drug use. Clients who reported a history of depression had twice as many lifetime hospitalizations and more than five times as many days with medical problems. Conclusions: Findings from this project provide information about the patterns of substance abuse and the importance of comprehensive assessments of trauma and comorbid conditions. Results point to the need for integrative coordinated care and auxiliary services for AI/AN clients seeking treatment for substance use disorders.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)498-504
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse
Volume38
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2012

Fingerprint

North American Indians
Substance-Related Disorders
Opioid Analgesics
National Institute on Drug Abuse (U.S.)
Urban Health
Health Services Accessibility
Therapeutics
Mood Disorders
Mental Disorders
Suicide
Psychiatry
Mental Health
Hospitalization
Clinical Trials
Depression
Wounds and Injuries
Research
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Population
Alaska Natives

Keywords

  • Indians
  • North American
  • Substance abuse treatment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

American Indians with substance use disorders : Treatment needs and comorbid conditions. / Rieckmann, Traci; McCarty, Dennis; Kovas, Anne; Spicer, Paul; Bray, Joe; Gilbert, Steve; Mercer, Jacqueline.

In: American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse, Vol. 38, No. 5, 09.2012, p. 498-504.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rieckmann, Traci ; McCarty, Dennis ; Kovas, Anne ; Spicer, Paul ; Bray, Joe ; Gilbert, Steve ; Mercer, Jacqueline. / American Indians with substance use disorders : Treatment needs and comorbid conditions. In: American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse. 2012 ; Vol. 38, No. 5. pp. 498-504.
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