Am I Sure I Want to Go Down This Road? Hesitations in the Reporting of Child Maltreatment by Nurses

Shelly S. Eisbach, Martha Driessnack

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore the process of mandated reporting of child maltreatment by pediatric nurses. DESIGN & METHODS: Qualitative description using a grounded theory lens was used with a cross-section of pediatric nurses. Results: A point of divergence in the reporting process appears to occur at the first of three moderating points. When nurses hesitate at this first point, decision-making becomes complex and delays the reporting process, giving rise to two themes: " It's the law" and " The ones that haunt you." Practice Implications: Increasing educational efforts focused on the recognition of child maltreatment may impact nurses' low rate of reporting.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)317-323
Number of pages7
JournalJournal for Specialists in Pediatric Nursing
Volume15
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Child Abuse
Nurses
Lenses
Decision Making
Pediatric Nurses
Practice (Psychology)
Recognition (Psychology)
Grounded Theory

Keywords

  • Child maltreatment
  • Mandatory reporting
  • Nursing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics

Cite this

Am I Sure I Want to Go Down This Road? Hesitations in the Reporting of Child Maltreatment by Nurses. / Eisbach, Shelly S.; Driessnack, Martha.

In: Journal for Specialists in Pediatric Nursing, Vol. 15, No. 4, 10.2010, p. 317-323.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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